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Disentangling the relation between intentions, planning, and behaviour: A moderated mediation analysis


Wiedemanna, A U; Schwarzer, R; Scholz, Urte; Sniehottac, F; Schürz, B (2009). Disentangling the relation between intentions, planning, and behaviour: A moderated mediation analysis. Psychology and Health, 24(1):67-79.

Abstract

Action planning is assumed to mediate between intentions and health behaviours.
Moreover, intentions are assumed to moderate the planning-behaviour relation,
because people with high intentions are more likely to enact their plans.
The present studies extend these suppositions by integrating both assumptions to
a novel and parsimonious model of moderated mediation: the mediation effect
is hypothesised to be stronger in individuals who report higher intention levels.
In two longitudinal studies on physical activity (N¼124) and interdental
hygiene (N¼209), intentions and action planning were assessed at baseline,
and behaviour was measured four (Study 1), and respectively, three (Study 2)
months later. The moderated mediation hypothesis was tested with
continuously measured intentions using regression analyses with non-parametric
bootstrapping. Results from both studies suggest that levels of intentions
moderate the mediation process: The strength of the mediated effect increased
along with levels of intentions. Planning mediates the intention-behaviour
relation, if individuals hold sufficient levels of intentions. Implications for
theory advancement and intervention development are discussed

Action planning is assumed to mediate between intentions and health behaviours.
Moreover, intentions are assumed to moderate the planning-behaviour relation,
because people with high intentions are more likely to enact their plans.
The present studies extend these suppositions by integrating both assumptions to
a novel and parsimonious model of moderated mediation: the mediation effect
is hypothesised to be stronger in individuals who report higher intention levels.
In two longitudinal studies on physical activity (N¼124) and interdental
hygiene (N¼209), intentions and action planning were assessed at baseline,
and behaviour was measured four (Study 1), and respectively, three (Study 2)
months later. The moderated mediation hypothesis was tested with
continuously measured intentions using regression analyses with non-parametric
bootstrapping. Results from both studies suggest that levels of intentions
moderate the mediation process: The strength of the mediated effect increased
along with levels of intentions. Planning mediates the intention-behaviour
relation, if individuals hold sufficient levels of intentions. Implications for
theory advancement and intervention development are discussed

Citations

55 citations in Web of Science®
59 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:January 2009
Deposited On:17 Feb 2010 11:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:44
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0887-0446
Publisher DOI:10.1080/08870440801958214
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-27051

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