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Multi-species biofilm formation on dental materials and an adhesive patch


Dezelic, T; Guggenheim, B; Schmidlin, P R (2009). Multi-species biofilm formation on dental materials and an adhesive patch. Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, 7(1):47-53.

Abstract

PURPOSE: This laboratory study assessed the influence of surface roughness and contact time on the formation of a multi-species biofilm on dental materials (adhesive patch, composite, amalgam and enamel). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rough and smooth specimens of each material were prepared and the mean surface roughness was assessed profilometrically. The biofilms were then allowed to grow either for 15 min or 15 h respectively on saliva-preconditioned specimens of each material, and colony-forming units on blood agar were counted (N = 9/group) Surface morphology was assessed using a scanning electron microscope. RESULTS: No difference was found in the biofilm formation rate among all the materials that were tested. After a short incubation period, a statistical significant difference between smooth and rough samples could be detected on amalgam and on the resin composite material (P < or = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Surface roughness may influence the initial biofilm adherence, but differences vanish following growth and maturation. The multi-species biofilm offers a reliable laboratory model for studying plaque formation.

PURPOSE: This laboratory study assessed the influence of surface roughness and contact time on the formation of a multi-species biofilm on dental materials (adhesive patch, composite, amalgam and enamel). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rough and smooth specimens of each material were prepared and the mean surface roughness was assessed profilometrically. The biofilms were then allowed to grow either for 15 min or 15 h respectively on saliva-preconditioned specimens of each material, and colony-forming units on blood agar were counted (N = 9/group) Surface morphology was assessed using a scanning electron microscope. RESULTS: No difference was found in the biofilm formation rate among all the materials that were tested. After a short incubation period, a statistical significant difference between smooth and rough samples could be detected on amalgam and on the resin composite material (P < or = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Surface roughness may influence the initial biofilm adherence, but differences vanish following growth and maturation. The multi-species biofilm offers a reliable laboratory model for studying plaque formation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Institute of Oral Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:30 March 2009
Deposited On:13 Jan 2010 08:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:44
Publisher:Quintessence Publishing
ISSN:1602-1622
Official URL:http://ohpd.quintessenz.de/index.php?doc=abstract&abstractID=15267
PubMed ID:19408815
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-27136

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