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Ancestral and monophyletic presence of diplostigmaty in Sebaea (Gentianaceae) and its potential role as a morphological mixed mating strategy


Kissling, J; Endress, P K; Bernasconi, G (2009). Ancestral and monophyletic presence of diplostigmaty in Sebaea (Gentianaceae) and its potential role as a morphological mixed mating strategy. The New Phytologist, 184(2):303-310.

Abstract

Diplostigmaty, the presence of a primary (apical) stigma and secondary (mid-stylar) stigmas along the style, is only known from the genus Sebaea (Gentianaceae). Early work indicated that the secondary stigmas provide a mechanism of autogamy, suggesting that it might ensure reproductive assurance. * Here, we test the monophyly of this unique morphological trait. Using Bayesian methods, we infer a nuclear DNA phylogeny for 96 accessions, including c. 50% of the species from the genus Sebaea. With this phylogeny, we infer the distribution of ancestral states on critical nodes using parsimony and likelihood methods. * The inferred nrDNA phylogeny shows that the genus Sebaea is divided in two statistically well-supported clades, A and B, consistent with recent estimates. The most recent ancestor (MRCA) of clade A, except the most basal species (Sebaea pusilla), is resolved as diplostigmatic. No reversal to a single stigma is observed within this clade. * We suggest that diplostigmaty is evolutionarily stable through time. We also discuss why this reproductive system is not found elsewhere than in Gentianaceae and the potential advantage of diplostigmaty as a stable mixed mating strategy.

Diplostigmaty, the presence of a primary (apical) stigma and secondary (mid-stylar) stigmas along the style, is only known from the genus Sebaea (Gentianaceae). Early work indicated that the secondary stigmas provide a mechanism of autogamy, suggesting that it might ensure reproductive assurance. * Here, we test the monophyly of this unique morphological trait. Using Bayesian methods, we infer a nuclear DNA phylogeny for 96 accessions, including c. 50% of the species from the genus Sebaea. With this phylogeny, we infer the distribution of ancestral states on critical nodes using parsimony and likelihood methods. * The inferred nrDNA phylogeny shows that the genus Sebaea is divided in two statistically well-supported clades, A and B, consistent with recent estimates. The most recent ancestor (MRCA) of clade A, except the most basal species (Sebaea pusilla), is resolved as diplostigmatic. No reversal to a single stigma is observed within this clade. * We suggest that diplostigmaty is evolutionarily stable through time. We also discuss why this reproductive system is not found elsewhere than in Gentianaceae and the potential advantage of diplostigmaty as a stable mixed mating strategy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Systematic Botany and Botanical Gardens
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:17 Jan 2010 19:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:45
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0028-646X
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.03000.x
PubMed ID:19796337
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-27348

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