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Alternative scaffolds: Expanding the options of antibodies


Plückthun, A (2009). Alternative scaffolds: Expanding the options of antibodies. In: Little, M. Recombinant antibodies for immunotherapy. New York, US: Cambridge University Press, 243-271.

Abstract

In the language of modern biotechnology, monoclonal antibodies (Köhler & Milstein, 1975) were the first "library" of proteins that was available, and the immune system was the first "selection" technology by which a specific binder could be obtained. However, only the subsequent introduction of molecular biology into this field allowed a true control over the molecules (reviewed, e.g., in Plückthun & Moroney, 2005; Weiner & Carter, 2003). This development of technologies was largely driven by the desire to use antibodies therapeutically, since the extraordinarily strong immune response to a nonhuman antibody in humans had put an end to essentially all of these endeavors. As will be illustrated in the following paragraphs, technological developments intended to solve this problem made not only the use of an animal immune system, but, ironically, also the antibody molecule itself dispensable.

In the language of modern biotechnology, monoclonal antibodies (Köhler & Milstein, 1975) were the first "library" of proteins that was available, and the immune system was the first "selection" technology by which a specific binder could be obtained. However, only the subsequent introduction of molecular biology into this field allowed a true control over the molecules (reviewed, e.g., in Plückthun & Moroney, 2005; Weiner & Carter, 2003). This development of technologies was largely driven by the desire to use antibodies therapeutically, since the extraordinarily strong immune response to a nonhuman antibody in humans had put an end to essentially all of these endeavors. As will be illustrated in the following paragraphs, technological developments intended to solve this problem made not only the use of an animal immune system, but, ironically, also the antibody molecule itself dispensable.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:23 Jan 2010 13:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:45
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISBN:978-0-521-88732-8
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511596773.021
Official URL:http://www.cambridge.org/9780521887328
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=005694567
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-27349

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