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Imaging genetics of cognitive functions: Focus on episodic memory


Rasch, B; Papassotiropoulos, A; de Quervain, D F (2010). Imaging genetics of cognitive functions: Focus on episodic memory. NeuroImage, 53(3):870-877.

Abstract

Human cognitive functions are highly variable across individuals and are both genetically and environmentally influenced. Recent behavioral genetics studies have identified several common genetic polymorphisms, which are related to individual differences in memory performance. In addition, imaging genetics studies are starting to explore the neural correlates of genetic differences in memory functions on the level of brain circuits. In this review we will describe how functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to validate and extend findings of behavioral genetics studies of episodic memory and give examples of recent advances in this new and exciting research field. In addition, we will present advantages and problems related to the different sensitivity of behavioral- vs. imaging genetics studies and discuss possible methodological approaches for an appropriate evaluation and integration of the results. Although the field of imaging genetics of episodic memory is still young, it already became clear that imaging methods have a large potential to enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie genetic differences in memory.

Abstract

Human cognitive functions are highly variable across individuals and are both genetically and environmentally influenced. Recent behavioral genetics studies have identified several common genetic polymorphisms, which are related to individual differences in memory performance. In addition, imaging genetics studies are starting to explore the neural correlates of genetic differences in memory functions on the level of brain circuits. In this review we will describe how functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to validate and extend findings of behavioral genetics studies of episodic memory and give examples of recent advances in this new and exciting research field. In addition, we will present advantages and problems related to the different sensitivity of behavioral- vs. imaging genetics studies and discuss possible methodological approaches for an appropriate evaluation and integration of the results. Although the field of imaging genetics of episodic memory is still young, it already became clear that imaging methods have a large potential to enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie genetic differences in memory.

Citations

28 citations in Web of Science®
31 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:10 Feb 2010 15:56
Last Modified:16 Aug 2016 10:13
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.01.001
PubMed ID:20060913

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