Quick Search:

uzh logo
Browse by:
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Zurich Open Repository and Archive 

Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-27796

van der Loo, B; Schildknecht, S; Zee, Rebecca; Bachschmid, M M (2009). Signalling processes in endothelial ageing in relation to chronic oxidative stress and their potential therapeutic implications in humans. Experimental Physiology, 94(3):305-310.

[img]
Preview
Accepted Version
PDF
1MB

Abstract

Ageing is an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular ageing is mainly characterized by endothelial dysfunction, an alteration of endothelium-dependent signalling processes and vascular remodelling. The underlying mechanisms comprise increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inactivation of nitric oxide (.NO) and subsequent formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Elevated ONOO(-) may exhibit new messenger functions by post-translational oxidative modification of intracellular regulatory proteins. Mitochondria are a major source of age-associated superoxide formation, as electrons are misdirected from the respiratory chain. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, is an integral part of the nucleoids and may protect mitochondrial DNA from ROS. A model linking .NO, mitochondria, MnSOD and its acetylation/deacetylation by sirtuins (NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylases) may be the basis for a potentially new powerful therapeutic intervention in the ageing process.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:15 Mar 2010 10:27
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 18:08
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0958-0670
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1113/expphysiol.2008.043315
PubMed ID:18996949
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 5
Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 9

Users (please log in): suggest update or correction for this item

Repository Staff Only: item control page