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The effect of different head and neck positions on the caudal back and hindlimb kinematics in the elite dressage horse at trot


Rhodin, M; Gomez Alvarez, C; Byström, A; Johnston, C; van Weeren, R; Weishaupt, Michael A (2009). The effect of different head and neck positions on the caudal back and hindlimb kinematics in the elite dressage horse at trot. Equine Veterinary Journal, 41(3):274-279.

Abstract

Reasons for performing study: Dressage involves training of the horse with the head and neck placed in a position defined by the rider. The best position for dressage training is currently under debate among riders and trainers, but there are few scientific data available to confirm or disprove the different views.
Objective: To evaluate the kinematic effects of different head and neck positions (HNPs) in elite dressage horses ridden at trot.
Methods: Seven high-level dressage horses were subjected to kinetic and kinematic measurements when ridden on a treadmill with the head and neck in 5 different positions.
Results: Compared to free trot on loose reins the HNP desired for collected trot at dressage competitions increased T6 vertical excursion, increased sacral flexion and decreased limb retraction after lift-off. Further increasing head or head and neck flexion caused few additional changes while an extremely elevated neck position increased hindlimb flexion and lumbar back extension during stance, increased hindlimb flexion during swing and further increased trunk vertical excursion.
Conclusions: The movements of the horse are significantly different when ridden on loose reins compared to the position used in collected trot. The exact degree of neck flexion is, however, not consistently correlated to the movements of the horse's limbs and trunk at collected trot. An extremely elevated neck position can produce some effects commonly associated with increased degree of collection, but the increased back extension observed with this position may place the horse at risk of injury if ridden in this position for a prolonged period.
Potential relevance: Head and neck positions influence significantly the kinematics of the ridden horse. It is important for riders and trainers to be aware of these effects in dressage training.

Abstract

Reasons for performing study: Dressage involves training of the horse with the head and neck placed in a position defined by the rider. The best position for dressage training is currently under debate among riders and trainers, but there are few scientific data available to confirm or disprove the different views.
Objective: To evaluate the kinematic effects of different head and neck positions (HNPs) in elite dressage horses ridden at trot.
Methods: Seven high-level dressage horses were subjected to kinetic and kinematic measurements when ridden on a treadmill with the head and neck in 5 different positions.
Results: Compared to free trot on loose reins the HNP desired for collected trot at dressage competitions increased T6 vertical excursion, increased sacral flexion and decreased limb retraction after lift-off. Further increasing head or head and neck flexion caused few additional changes while an extremely elevated neck position increased hindlimb flexion and lumbar back extension during stance, increased hindlimb flexion during swing and further increased trunk vertical excursion.
Conclusions: The movements of the horse are significantly different when ridden on loose reins compared to the position used in collected trot. The exact degree of neck flexion is, however, not consistently correlated to the movements of the horse's limbs and trunk at collected trot. An extremely elevated neck position can produce some effects commonly associated with increased degree of collection, but the increased back extension observed with this position may place the horse at risk of injury if ridden in this position for a prolonged period.
Potential relevance: Head and neck positions influence significantly the kinematics of the ridden horse. It is important for riders and trainers to be aware of these effects in dressage training.

Citations

28 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:21 Jan 2010 13:57
Last Modified:07 Jun 2016 07:11
Publisher:Equine Veterinary Journal
ISSN:0425-1644
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2746/042516409X394436
PubMed ID:19469235

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