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Monocyclic arenes, quasiarenes, and annulenes


Monocyclic arenes, quasiarenes, and annulenes. Edited by: Siegel, J S; Tobe, Y (2009). Stuttgart, DE: Thieme.

Abstract

Science of synthesis / ed. by D. Bellus ... Managing ed.: Today, commodity aromatic chemical production is a multibilliondollar industry, with worldwide production of benzene alone estimated to be 37 million tons per year (2007).

Beyond benzene, condensed-ring aromatic compounds such as naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene provide the scaffolding for many of the molecules the average person comes into contact with in daily life. The ready availability of polynuclear aromatic feedstocks has placed them center stage for the development of commercial chemicals such as dyestuffs, pharmaceuticals, and plastics. From aspirin to Zoloft, aromatic chemistry is the core of biological action. Fragrances, such as musks, found in commercial care products rely on the stability of the aromatic core to withstand harsh conditions such as those found in the use of laundry detergent in combination with bleach.

Various types of aromatic species are presented in this volume but the emphasis is on the formation of aromatic nuclei and bonds directly to an aromatic nucleus.

Overall, the expanse of Volume 45 is enormous, as is the field of aromatic chemistry. The various authors who have devoted their precious time to this adventure are to be heartily thanked. Without their dedication to this project it would not have been possible for us to bring this to fruition. We hope that the information in the following pages provides a good foundation in real-life, reliable methods for the preparation and derivatization of aromatic compounds.

Science of synthesis / ed. by D. Bellus ... Managing ed.: Today, commodity aromatic chemical production is a multibilliondollar industry, with worldwide production of benzene alone estimated to be 37 million tons per year (2007).

Beyond benzene, condensed-ring aromatic compounds such as naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene provide the scaffolding for many of the molecules the average person comes into contact with in daily life. The ready availability of polynuclear aromatic feedstocks has placed them center stage for the development of commercial chemicals such as dyestuffs, pharmaceuticals, and plastics. From aspirin to Zoloft, aromatic chemistry is the core of biological action. Fragrances, such as musks, found in commercial care products rely on the stability of the aromatic core to withstand harsh conditions such as those found in the use of laundry detergent in combination with bleach.

Various types of aromatic species are presented in this volume but the emphasis is on the formation of aromatic nuclei and bonds directly to an aromatic nucleus.

Overall, the expanse of Volume 45 is enormous, as is the field of aromatic chemistry. The various authors who have devoted their precious time to this adventure are to be heartily thanked. Without their dedication to this project it would not have been possible for us to bring this to fruition. We hope that the information in the following pages provides a good foundation in real-life, reliable methods for the preparation and derivatization of aromatic compounds.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Edited Scientific Work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:22 Jan 2010 13:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:47
Publisher:Thieme
Series Name: Science of Synthesis
Volume:45a, Category 6
Number of Pages:545
ISBN:978-3-13-118981-3 (Stuttgart) 978-1-58890-536-9 (New York)
Official URL:http://www.thieme-chemistry.com/en/products/reference-works/science-of-synthesis/format/print-edition/category/6/vol-45a.html

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