UZH-Logo

Research challenges for permafrost in steep and cold terrain: an alpine perspective


Haeberli, W; Gruber, S (2008). Research challenges for permafrost in steep and cold terrain: an alpine perspective. In: 9th International Conference on Permafrost, Fairbanks, Alaska, 29 June 2008 - 3 July 2008, 597-605.

Abstract

The past few decades have seen a rapid development and progress in research on permafrost in mountain areas with complex and rugged topography such as the European Alps. At the same time, it becomes increasingly clear that climate change impacts have the potential to severely affect future living conditions in areas with steep and cold terrain by influencing the chain of surface processes that link debris production via rock fall to talus/moraine formation, creep deformation of frozen deposits, and material evacuation by debris flows and fluvial transport. Key scientific challenges relate to special aspects induced by complex topography. Corresponding aspects are briefly outlined concerning the relation between the atmosphere and the permafrost in areas with highly variable snow cover and potentially strong lateral energy fluxes, permafrost thermal conditions in mountains with pronounced microclimatic asymmetries, the destabilization of steep to near-vertical rock walls and degrading permafrost, the flow and stability of ice-rich frozen debris with increasing subsurface temperature and melt water availability, interactions between glaciers and permafrost under conditions of rapid if not accelerating change, 4D-evolution of permafrost in rugged mountain topography, and hazards from permafrost slopes in densely populated high-mountain chains.

The past few decades have seen a rapid development and progress in research on permafrost in mountain areas with complex and rugged topography such as the European Alps. At the same time, it becomes increasingly clear that climate change impacts have the potential to severely affect future living conditions in areas with steep and cold terrain by influencing the chain of surface processes that link debris production via rock fall to talus/moraine formation, creep deformation of frozen deposits, and material evacuation by debris flows and fluvial transport. Key scientific challenges relate to special aspects induced by complex topography. Corresponding aspects are briefly outlined concerning the relation between the atmosphere and the permafrost in areas with highly variable snow cover and potentially strong lateral energy fluxes, permafrost thermal conditions in mountains with pronounced microclimatic asymmetries, the destabilization of steep to near-vertical rock walls and degrading permafrost, the flow and stability of ice-rich frozen debris with increasing subsurface temperature and melt water availability, interactions between glaciers and permafrost under conditions of rapid if not accelerating change, 4D-evolution of permafrost in rugged mountain topography, and hazards from permafrost slopes in densely populated high-mountain chains.

Downloads

124 downloads since deposited on 29 Aug 2008
32 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Event End Date:3 July 2008
Deposited On:29 Aug 2008 09:18
Last Modified:19 Jul 2016 12:12
ISBN:978-0-9800179-2-2
Official URL:http://uspermafrost.org/meetings/nicop/proceedings.html
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2807

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 5MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations