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Population-based trend analysis of 2813 patients undergoing laparoscopic sigmoid resection


Guller, U; Rosella, L; Karanicolas, P J; Adamina, M; Hahnloser, D (2010). Population-based trend analysis of 2813 patients undergoing laparoscopic sigmoid resection. British Journal of Surgery, 97(1):79-85.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The use of laparoscopic sigmoid resection for diverticular disease has become increasingly popular. The objective of this trend analysis was to assess whether clinical outcomes following laparoscopic sigmoid resection for diverticular disease have improved over the past 10 years. METHODS: The analysis was based on the prospective database of the Swiss Association of Laparoscopic and Thoracoscopic Surgery. Some 2813 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic sigmoid resection for diverticular disease from 1995 to 2006 were included. Unadjusted and risk-adjusted analyses were performed. RESULTS: Over time, there was a significant reduction in the conversion rate (from 27.3 to 8.6 per cent; P(trend) < 0.001), local postoperative complication rate (23.6 to 6.2 per cent; P(trend) = 0.004), general postoperative complication rate (14.6 to 4.9 per cent; P(trend) = 0.024) and reoperation rate (5.5 to 0.6 per cent; P(trend) = 0.015). Postoperative median length of hospital stay significantly decreased from 11 to 7 days (P(trend) < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This first trend analysis in the literature of clinical outcomes after laparoscopic sigmoid resection, based on almost 3000 patients, has provided compelling evidence that rates of postoperative complications, conversion and reoperation, and length of hospital stay have decreased significantly over the past 10 years.

BACKGROUND: The use of laparoscopic sigmoid resection for diverticular disease has become increasingly popular. The objective of this trend analysis was to assess whether clinical outcomes following laparoscopic sigmoid resection for diverticular disease have improved over the past 10 years. METHODS: The analysis was based on the prospective database of the Swiss Association of Laparoscopic and Thoracoscopic Surgery. Some 2813 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic sigmoid resection for diverticular disease from 1995 to 2006 were included. Unadjusted and risk-adjusted analyses were performed. RESULTS: Over time, there was a significant reduction in the conversion rate (from 27.3 to 8.6 per cent; P(trend) < 0.001), local postoperative complication rate (23.6 to 6.2 per cent; P(trend) = 0.004), general postoperative complication rate (14.6 to 4.9 per cent; P(trend) = 0.024) and reoperation rate (5.5 to 0.6 per cent; P(trend) = 0.015). Postoperative median length of hospital stay significantly decreased from 11 to 7 days (P(trend) < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This first trend analysis in the literature of clinical outcomes after laparoscopic sigmoid resection, based on almost 3000 patients, has provided compelling evidence that rates of postoperative complications, conversion and reoperation, and length of hospital stay have decreased significantly over the past 10 years.

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13 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:20 Mar 2010 16:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:48
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0007-1323
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/bjs.6787
PubMed ID:20013934

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