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Fast inhibitory transmission of pain in the spinal cord


Zeilhofer, H U; Witschi, R; Johansson, T (2009). Fast inhibitory transmission of pain in the spinal cord. In: Malcangio, M. Synaptic Plasticity in Pain. London: Springer, 49-66.

Abstract

The gate-control-theory of pain attributes a pivotal role in nociceptive processing to inhibitory interneurons in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Loss of synaptic inhibition is a contributing factor to the generation and maintenance of chronic pain. Different signaling pathways involved in inflammatory and neuropathic pain converge onto diminished synaptic inhibition in the spinal dorsal horn. Accordingly, restoring inhibition through drugs that facilitate GABAergic or glycinergic neurotransmission should reverse exaggerated pain sensitivity. Indeed, subtype-selective GABAA receptor ligands and inhibitors of glycine transporters might constitute new treatments for chronic pain.

The gate-control-theory of pain attributes a pivotal role in nociceptive processing to inhibitory interneurons in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Loss of synaptic inhibition is a contributing factor to the generation and maintenance of chronic pain. Different signaling pathways involved in inflammatory and neuropathic pain converge onto diminished synaptic inhibition in the spinal dorsal horn. Accordingly, restoring inhibition through drugs that facilitate GABAergic or glycinergic neurotransmission should reverse exaggerated pain sensitivity. Indeed, subtype-selective GABAA receptor ligands and inhibitors of glycine transporters might constitute new treatments for chronic pain.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:27 May 2009
Deposited On:17 Feb 2010 13:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:48
Publisher:Springer
ISBN:978-1-4419-0225-2
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0226-9

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