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Children with congenital hypothyroidism: long-term intellectual outcome after early high-dose treatment


Dimitropoulos, A; Molinari, L; Etter, K; Torresani, T; Lang-Muritano, M; Jenni, O G; Largo, R H; Latal, B (2009). Children with congenital hypothyroidism: long-term intellectual outcome after early high-dose treatment. Pediatric Research, 65(2):242-248.

Abstract

We aim to determine long-term intellectual outcome of adolescents with early high-dose treated congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Sixty-three prospectively followed children with CH were assessed at age of 14 y with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised and compared with 175 healthy controls. Median age at onset of treatment was 9 d (range 5-18 d) and median starting dose of levothyroxine (L-T4) was 14.7 microg/kg/d (range 9.9-23.6 microg/kg/d). Full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) was significantly lower than in controls after adjustment for socioeconomic status (SES) and gender (101.7 versus 111.4; p < 0.0001). Children with athyreosis had a lower performance IQ than those with dysgenesis (adjusted difference 7.6 IQ scores, p < 0.05). Lower initial thyroxine (T4) levels correlated with poorer IQ (r = 0.27, p = 0.04). Lower SES was associated with poorer IQ, in particular in children with CH (interaction, p = 0.03). Treatment during childhood was not related to IQ at age 14 y. Adolescents with CH manifest IQ deficits when compared with their peers despite early high-dose treatment and optimal substitution therapy throughout childhood. Those adolescents with athyreosis and lower SES are at particular risk for adverse outcome. Therefore, early detection of intellectual deficits is mandatory in children with CH.

We aim to determine long-term intellectual outcome of adolescents with early high-dose treated congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Sixty-three prospectively followed children with CH were assessed at age of 14 y with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised and compared with 175 healthy controls. Median age at onset of treatment was 9 d (range 5-18 d) and median starting dose of levothyroxine (L-T4) was 14.7 microg/kg/d (range 9.9-23.6 microg/kg/d). Full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) was significantly lower than in controls after adjustment for socioeconomic status (SES) and gender (101.7 versus 111.4; p < 0.0001). Children with athyreosis had a lower performance IQ than those with dysgenesis (adjusted difference 7.6 IQ scores, p < 0.05). Lower initial thyroxine (T4) levels correlated with poorer IQ (r = 0.27, p = 0.04). Lower SES was associated with poorer IQ, in particular in children with CH (interaction, p = 0.03). Treatment during childhood was not related to IQ at age 14 y. Adolescents with CH manifest IQ deficits when compared with their peers despite early high-dose treatment and optimal substitution therapy throughout childhood. Those adolescents with athyreosis and lower SES are at particular risk for adverse outcome. Therefore, early detection of intellectual deficits is mandatory in children with CH.

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27 citations in Web of Science®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:02 Feb 2010 10:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:49
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0031-3998
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1203/PDR.0b013e31818d2030
Related URLs:https://www.zora.uzh.ch/28629/
PubMed ID:18787501

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