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The modified Flavonol glycosylation profile in the Arabidopsis rol1 mutants results in alterations in plant growth and cell shape formation


Ringli, C; Bigler, L; Kuhn, B M; Leiber, R M; Diet, A; Santelia, D; Frey, Beat; Pollmann, S; Klein, M (2008). The modified Flavonol glycosylation profile in the Arabidopsis rol1 mutants results in alterations in plant growth and cell shape formation. Plant Cell, 20(6):1470-1481.

Abstract

Flavonoids are secondary metabolites known to modulate plant growth and development. A primary function of flavonols, a subgroup of flavonoids, is thought to be the modification of auxin fluxes in the plant. Flavonols in the cell are glycosylated, and the repressor of lrx1 (rol1) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, affected in rhamnose biosynthesis, have a modified flavonol glycosylation profile. A detailed analysis of the rol1-2 allele revealed hyponastic growth, aberrant pavement cell and stomatal morphology in cotyledons, and defective trichome formation. Blocking flavonoid biosynthesis suppresses the rol1-2 shoot phenotype, suggesting that it is induced by the modified flavonol profile. The hyponastic cotyledons of rol1-2 are likely to be the result of a flavonol-induced increase in auxin concentration. By contrast, the pavement cell, stomata, and trichome formation phenotypes appear not to be induced by the modified auxin distribution. Together, these results suggest that changes in the composition of flavonols can have a tremendous impact on plant development through both auxin-induced and auxin-independent processes.

Flavonoids are secondary metabolites known to modulate plant growth and development. A primary function of flavonols, a subgroup of flavonoids, is thought to be the modification of auxin fluxes in the plant. Flavonols in the cell are glycosylated, and the repressor of lrx1 (rol1) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, affected in rhamnose biosynthesis, have a modified flavonol glycosylation profile. A detailed analysis of the rol1-2 allele revealed hyponastic growth, aberrant pavement cell and stomatal morphology in cotyledons, and defective trichome formation. Blocking flavonoid biosynthesis suppresses the rol1-2 shoot phenotype, suggesting that it is induced by the modified flavonol profile. The hyponastic cotyledons of rol1-2 are likely to be the result of a flavonol-induced increase in auxin concentration. By contrast, the pavement cell, stomata, and trichome formation phenotypes appear not to be induced by the modified auxin distribution. Together, these results suggest that changes in the composition of flavonols can have a tremendous impact on plant development through both auxin-induced and auxin-independent processes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:25 Aug 2008 15:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:24
Publisher:American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN:1040-4651
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation, NCCR Plant Survival, Julius-Klaus Stiftung, Forschungskommission der Universität Zürich
Publisher DOI:10.1105/tpc.107.053249
PubMed ID:18567791
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2868

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