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An animal model in sheep for biocompatibility testing of biomaterials in cancellous bones


Nuss, Katja M; Auer, Jörg A; Boos, Alois; von Rechenberg, Brigitte (2006). An animal model in sheep for biocompatibility testing of biomaterials in cancellous bones. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 67:7.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The past years have seen the development of many synthetic bone replacements. To test their biocompatibility and ability for osseointegration, osseoinduction and -conduction requires their placement within bone preferably in an animal experiment of a higher species. METHODS: A suitable experimental animal model in sheep with drill holes of 8 mm diameter and 13 mm depth within the proximal and distal humerus and femur for testing biocompatibility issues is introduced. RESULTS: This present sheep model allows the placing of up to 8 different test materials within one animal and because of the standardization of the bone defect, routine evaluation by means of histomorphometry is easily conducted. This method was used successfully in 66 White Alpine Sheep. When the drill holes were correctly placed no complications such as spontaneous fractures were encountered. CONCLUSION: This experimental animal model serves an excellent basis for testing the biocompatibility of novel biomaterials to be used as bone replacement or new bone formation enhancing materials.

BACKGROUND: The past years have seen the development of many synthetic bone replacements. To test their biocompatibility and ability for osseointegration, osseoinduction and -conduction requires their placement within bone preferably in an animal experiment of a higher species. METHODS: A suitable experimental animal model in sheep with drill holes of 8 mm diameter and 13 mm depth within the proximal and distal humerus and femur for testing biocompatibility issues is introduced. RESULTS: This present sheep model allows the placing of up to 8 different test materials within one animal and because of the standardization of the bone defect, routine evaluation by means of histomorphometry is easily conducted. This method was used successfully in 66 White Alpine Sheep. When the drill holes were correctly placed no complications such as spontaneous fractures were encountered. CONCLUSION: This experimental animal model serves an excellent basis for testing the biocompatibility of novel biomaterials to be used as bone replacement or new bone formation enhancing materials.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:11
Last Modified:01 Jun 2016 07:01
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2474
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1186/1471-2474-7-67
Official URL:http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2474-7-67.pdf
PubMed ID:16911787
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-29

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