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Aortic valve vegetation without endocarditis


Salzberg, S P; Nemirovsky, D; Goldman, M E; Adams, D H (2009). Aortic valve vegetation without endocarditis. Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 88(1):267-269.

Abstract

We present a 30-year-old man with an acute middle cerebral artery territory infarction. A transesophageal echocardiogram showed a large, highly mobile mass attached to the patient's aortic valve. We discuss the differential diagnosis of a cardiac mass that includes infection, tumor, and thrombus. A complete workup showed no evidence of systemic infection but did reveal the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The patient also had a history of a right lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started, and follow-up showed complete resolution of the aortic valve lesion. This case highlights that when a valvular vegetation is encountered in a clinical setting that does not suggest infectious endocarditis, the diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome should be considered. This case and our review of the literature suggest that vegetations in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, no matter how large and ominous in appearance, can be treated successfully with anticoagulation and vigilant observation.

We present a 30-year-old man with an acute middle cerebral artery territory infarction. A transesophageal echocardiogram showed a large, highly mobile mass attached to the patient's aortic valve. We discuss the differential diagnosis of a cardiac mass that includes infection, tumor, and thrombus. A complete workup showed no evidence of systemic infection but did reveal the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. The patient also had a history of a right lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started, and follow-up showed complete resolution of the aortic valve lesion. This case highlights that when a valvular vegetation is encountered in a clinical setting that does not suggest infectious endocarditis, the diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome should be considered. This case and our review of the literature suggest that vegetations in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, no matter how large and ominous in appearance, can be treated successfully with anticoagulation and vigilant observation.

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1 citation in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:04 Feb 2010 17:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:51
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0003-4975
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2008.10.006
PubMed ID:19559240

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