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Profound but dysfunctional lymphangiogenesis via vascular endothelial growth factor ligands from CD11b+ macrophages in advanced ovarian cancer


Jeon, B H; Jang, C; Han, J; Kataru, R P; Piao, L; Jung, K; Cha, H J; Schwendener, R; Jang, K Y; Kim, K S; Alitalo, K; Koh, G Y (2008). Profound but dysfunctional lymphangiogenesis via vascular endothelial growth factor ligands from CD11b+ macrophages in advanced ovarian cancer. Cancer Research, 68(4):1100-9.

Abstract

Severe ascites is a hallmark of advanced ovarian cancer (OVCA), yet the underlying mechanism that creates an imbalance between peritoneal vascular leakage and lymphatic drainage is unknown. Here, we identified and characterized peritoneal lymphatic vessels in OVCA mice, a model generated by implantation of human OVCA cells into athymic nude mice. The OVCA mice displayed substantial lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic remodeling, massive infiltration of CD11b(+)/LYVE-1(+) macrophages and disseminated carcinomatosis in the mesentery and diaphragm, and progressive chylous ascites formation. Functional assays indicated that the abnormally abundant lymphatic vessels in the diaphragm were not conductive in peritoneal fluid drainage. Moreover, lipid absorbed from the gut leaked out from the aberrant mesenteric lymphatic vessels. Our results indicate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C, VEGF-D, and VEGF-A from CD11b(+) macrophages are responsible for producing OVCA-induced dysfunctional lymphangiogenesis, although other cell types contribute to the increased ascites formation. Accordingly, the combined blockade of VEGF-C/D and VEGF-A signaling with soluble VEGF receptor-3 and VEGF-Trap, respectively, markedly inhibited chylous ascites formation. These findings provide additional therapeutic targets to ameliorate chylous ascites formation in patients with advanced OVCA.

Severe ascites is a hallmark of advanced ovarian cancer (OVCA), yet the underlying mechanism that creates an imbalance between peritoneal vascular leakage and lymphatic drainage is unknown. Here, we identified and characterized peritoneal lymphatic vessels in OVCA mice, a model generated by implantation of human OVCA cells into athymic nude mice. The OVCA mice displayed substantial lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic remodeling, massive infiltration of CD11b(+)/LYVE-1(+) macrophages and disseminated carcinomatosis in the mesentery and diaphragm, and progressive chylous ascites formation. Functional assays indicated that the abnormally abundant lymphatic vessels in the diaphragm were not conductive in peritoneal fluid drainage. Moreover, lipid absorbed from the gut leaked out from the aberrant mesenteric lymphatic vessels. Our results indicate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C, VEGF-D, and VEGF-A from CD11b(+) macrophages are responsible for producing OVCA-induced dysfunctional lymphangiogenesis, although other cell types contribute to the increased ascites formation. Accordingly, the combined blockade of VEGF-C/D and VEGF-A signaling with soluble VEGF receptor-3 and VEGF-Trap, respectively, markedly inhibited chylous ascites formation. These findings provide additional therapeutic targets to ameliorate chylous ascites formation in patients with advanced OVCA.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:26 Aug 2008 15:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:25
Publisher:American Association for Cancer Research
ISSN:0008-5472
Publisher DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-07-2572
PubMed ID:18281485
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-2946

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