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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-29636

Grünblatt, E; Bartl, J; Zehetmayer, S; Ringel, T M; Bauer, P; Riederer, P; Jacob, C P (2009). Gene expression as peripheral biomarkers for sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 16(3):627-634.

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Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. At present, diagnosis of AD is rather late in the disease. Therefore, we attempted to find peripheral biomarkers for the early diagnosis of AD. We investigated the profiles of 33 genes, previously found by our group to have altered expression in postmortem brains of AD. The gene profiles were studied via quantitative-real-time-reverse-transcription-polymerase-chain-reaction, in whole blood samples (collected with the PAXgene blood RNA system) isolated from a population clinically diagnosed with AD and healthy controls (1-year period/ up to 4 samples). Five genes showed significant correlation to the dementia score, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Focusing on the two genes with the smallest p-value, H3-histone and cannabinoid-receptor-2, notable increases in these genes were found in peripheral blood mRNA in subjects with lower MMSE scores. Seasonal variations in gene expression were not significant due to sample size, but did seem to vary due to time of sample withdrawal. In conclusion, gene expression profiling might be a promising method to investigating a large population with the aim of developing an early diagnosis of AD.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:05 Feb 2010 09:21
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 18:07
Publisher:IOS Press
ISSN:1387-2877
Publisher DOI:10.3233/JAD-2009-0996
PubMed ID:19276557
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 28
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Scopus®. Citation Count: 33

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