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Vagal sparing surgical technique but not stoma size affects body weight loss in rodent model of gastric bypass


Bueter, M; Löwenstein, C; Ashrafian, H; Hillebrand, J; Bloom, S R; Olbers, T; Lutz, T A; le Roux, C W (2010). Vagal sparing surgical technique but not stoma size affects body weight loss in rodent model of gastric bypass. Obesity Surgery, 20(5):616-622.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether gastric bypass with or without vagal preservation resulted in a different outcome. METHODS: Body weight, food intake and postprandial peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) levels were compared between gastric bypass (n = 55) and sham-operated rats (n = 27) in three groups. In group 1 (n = 17), the vagal nerve was not preserved, while in group 2 the vagal nerve was preserved during gastric bypass (n = 10). In group 3, gastric bypass rats (n = 28) were randomised for either one of the two techniques. RESULTS: Rats in which the vagal nerve was preserved during gastric bypass showed a lower body weight (p < 0.001) and reduced food intake (p < 0.001) compared to rats in which the vagal nerve was not preserved during the gastric bypass operation. Levels of PYY and GLP-1 were significantly increased after gastric bypass compared to sham-operated controls (p < 0.05), but there was no difference between gastric bypass rats with and without vagal preservation. Differences in food intake and body weight were not related to the size of the gastro-jejunostomy in gastric bypass rats. There were no signs of malabsorption or inflammation after gastric bypass. CONCLUSION: We propose that the vagal nerve should be preserved during the gastric bypass operation as this might play an important role for the mechanisms that induce weight loss and reduce food intake in rats. In contrast, the gastro-jejunal stoma size was found to be of minor relevance.

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether gastric bypass with or without vagal preservation resulted in a different outcome. METHODS: Body weight, food intake and postprandial peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) levels were compared between gastric bypass (n = 55) and sham-operated rats (n = 27) in three groups. In group 1 (n = 17), the vagal nerve was not preserved, while in group 2 the vagal nerve was preserved during gastric bypass (n = 10). In group 3, gastric bypass rats (n = 28) were randomised for either one of the two techniques. RESULTS: Rats in which the vagal nerve was preserved during gastric bypass showed a lower body weight (p < 0.001) and reduced food intake (p < 0.001) compared to rats in which the vagal nerve was not preserved during the gastric bypass operation. Levels of PYY and GLP-1 were significantly increased after gastric bypass compared to sham-operated controls (p < 0.05), but there was no difference between gastric bypass rats with and without vagal preservation. Differences in food intake and body weight were not related to the size of the gastro-jejunostomy in gastric bypass rats. There were no signs of malabsorption or inflammation after gastric bypass. CONCLUSION: We propose that the vagal nerve should be preserved during the gastric bypass operation as this might play an important role for the mechanisms that induce weight loss and reduce food intake in rats. In contrast, the gastro-jejunal stoma size was found to be of minor relevance.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:08 Feb 2010 14:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0960-8923
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11695-010-0075-5
PubMed ID:20119735
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-29881

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