UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in a growth-enhanced transgenic (GH-overexpressing) bony fish, the tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus): indication for a higher impact of autocrine/paracrine than of endocrine IGF-I


Eppler, E; Caelers, A; Shved, N; Hwang, G; Rahman, A M; Maclean, N; Zapf, J; Reinecke, M (2007). Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in a growth-enhanced transgenic (GH-overexpressing) bony fish, the tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus): indication for a higher impact of autocrine/paracrine than of endocrine IGF-I. Transgenic Research, 16(4):479-489.

Abstract

Several lines of growth hormone (GH)-overexpressing fish have been produced and analysed for growth and fertility parameters. However, only few data are available on the growth-promoting hormone insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) that mediates most effects of GH, and these are contradictory. Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, radioimmunoassay, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and radiochromatography we investigated IGF-I and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in an adult (17 months old) transgenic (GH-overexpressing) tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The transgenics showed an around 1.5-fold increase in length and an approximately 2.3-fold higher weight than the non-transgenics. Using radioimmunoassay, the serum IGF-I levels were lower (6.22 +/- 0.75 ng/ml) in transgenic than in wild-type (15.01 +/- 1.49 ng/ml) individuals (P = 0.0012). Radioimmunoassayable IGF-I in transgenic liver was 4.2-times higher than in wild-type (16.0 +/- 2.21 vs. 3.83 +/- 0.71 ng/g, P = 0.0017). No hepatocytes in wild-type but numerous hepatocytes in transgenic liver contained IGF-I-immunoreactivity. RT-PCR revealed a 1.4-times higher IGF-I mRNA expression in the liver of the transgenics (10.51 +/- 0.82 vs. 7.3 +/- 0.49 pg/microg total RNA, P = 0.0032). In correspondence, in situ hybridization showed more IGF-I mRNA containing hepatocytes in the transgenics. A twofold elevated IGF-I mRNA expression was determined in the skeletal muscle of transgenics (0.33 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.16 +/- 0.01 pg/microg total RNA, P < 0.0001). Both liver and serum of transgenics showed increased IGF-I binding. The increased IGFBP content in the liver may lead to retention of IGF-I, and/or the release of IGF-I into the circulation may be slower resulting in accumulation of IGF-I in the hepatocytes. Our results indicate that the enhanced growth of the transgenics likely is due to enhanced autocrine/paracrine action of IGF-I in extrahepatic sites, as shown here for skeletal muscle.

Several lines of growth hormone (GH)-overexpressing fish have been produced and analysed for growth and fertility parameters. However, only few data are available on the growth-promoting hormone insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) that mediates most effects of GH, and these are contradictory. Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, radioimmunoassay, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and radiochromatography we investigated IGF-I and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in an adult (17 months old) transgenic (GH-overexpressing) tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The transgenics showed an around 1.5-fold increase in length and an approximately 2.3-fold higher weight than the non-transgenics. Using radioimmunoassay, the serum IGF-I levels were lower (6.22 +/- 0.75 ng/ml) in transgenic than in wild-type (15.01 +/- 1.49 ng/ml) individuals (P = 0.0012). Radioimmunoassayable IGF-I in transgenic liver was 4.2-times higher than in wild-type (16.0 +/- 2.21 vs. 3.83 +/- 0.71 ng/g, P = 0.0017). No hepatocytes in wild-type but numerous hepatocytes in transgenic liver contained IGF-I-immunoreactivity. RT-PCR revealed a 1.4-times higher IGF-I mRNA expression in the liver of the transgenics (10.51 +/- 0.82 vs. 7.3 +/- 0.49 pg/microg total RNA, P = 0.0032). In correspondence, in situ hybridization showed more IGF-I mRNA containing hepatocytes in the transgenics. A twofold elevated IGF-I mRNA expression was determined in the skeletal muscle of transgenics (0.33 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.16 +/- 0.01 pg/microg total RNA, P < 0.0001). Both liver and serum of transgenics showed increased IGF-I binding. The increased IGFBP content in the liver may lead to retention of IGF-I, and/or the release of IGF-I into the circulation may be slower resulting in accumulation of IGF-I in the hepatocytes. Our results indicate that the enhanced growth of the transgenics likely is due to enhanced autocrine/paracrine action of IGF-I in extrahepatic sites, as shown here for skeletal muscle.

Citations

29 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2007
Deposited On:24 Mar 2010 16:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0962-8819
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11248-007-9093-z
PubMed ID:17431805

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations