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Human dendritic cells process and present Listeria antigens for in vitro priming of autologous CD4+ T lymphocytes


Eppler, E; Walch, M; Latinovic-Golic, S; Dumrese, C; Filgueira, L; Groscurth, P (2005). Human dendritic cells process and present Listeria antigens for in vitro priming of autologous CD4+ T lymphocytes. Histochemistry and Cell Biology, 123(2):169-178.

Abstract

The role of human dendritic cells (DC) in the immune response toward intracellularly growing Listeria was analyzed under in vitro conditions using several morphological and functional methods. DC incubated with Listeria innocua and L. monocytogenes, respectively, readily phagocytosed the bacteria. Listeria did not impair viability and immunogenic potential of human DC. Listerial antigens were found to be processed within the lysosomal compartment of DC and colocalized with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, as shown by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. DC challenged with apathogenic L. innocua were highly effective in priming autologous naive T cells (mainly CD4+) in vitro. The T cells strongly proliferated in the presence of DC incubated with L. innocua, which could be significantly inhibited by anti-MHC II mAb. L. innocua-primed T cells were also successfully stimulated by DC harboring the pathogenic L. monocytogenes, either the wild-type strain EGD or the p60 reduced mutant strain RIII. From our results, we conclude that human DC infected with nonpathogenic intracellular bacteria are able to efficiently prime naive T cells, which are then suitable for recognition of antigens derived from related virulent bacterial species. This in vitro human model provides an interesting tool for basic research in infectious immunology and possibly for a new immunotherapy.

The role of human dendritic cells (DC) in the immune response toward intracellularly growing Listeria was analyzed under in vitro conditions using several morphological and functional methods. DC incubated with Listeria innocua and L. monocytogenes, respectively, readily phagocytosed the bacteria. Listeria did not impair viability and immunogenic potential of human DC. Listerial antigens were found to be processed within the lysosomal compartment of DC and colocalized with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, as shown by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. DC challenged with apathogenic L. innocua were highly effective in priming autologous naive T cells (mainly CD4+) in vitro. The T cells strongly proliferated in the presence of DC incubated with L. innocua, which could be significantly inhibited by anti-MHC II mAb. L. innocua-primed T cells were also successfully stimulated by DC harboring the pathogenic L. monocytogenes, either the wild-type strain EGD or the p60 reduced mutant strain RIII. From our results, we conclude that human DC infected with nonpathogenic intracellular bacteria are able to efficiently prime naive T cells, which are then suitable for recognition of antigens derived from related virulent bacterial species. This in vitro human model provides an interesting tool for basic research in infectious immunology and possibly for a new immunotherapy.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2005
Deposited On:23 Mar 2010 09:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0948-6143
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00418-005-0758-5
PubMed ID:15812647

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