UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Etiology of reactive arthritis in Pan paniscus, P. troglodytes troglodytes, and P. troglodytes schweinfurthii


Rothschild, Bruce M; Rühli, Frank J (2005). Etiology of reactive arthritis in Pan paniscus, P. troglodytes troglodytes, and P. troglodytes schweinfurthii. American Journal of Primatology, 66(3):219-231.

Abstract

The character of arthritis has not received the same attention in Pan paniscus as it has in P. troglodytes. Reactive arthritis (a form of spondyloarthropathy) in the latter has been considered to be either a sexually transmitted or an infectious-agent diarrhea-related disorder. The unique sexual promiscuity of P. paniscus enables us to distinguish between those hypotheses. The macerated skeletons of 139 adult P. paniscus, P. troglodytes troglodytes, and P. troglodytes schweinfurthii were macroscopically analyzed for osseous and articular pathologies. The sex of the animal was recorded at the time of acquisition. Twenty-one percent of the P. paniscus, 28% of the P. t. troglodytes, and 27% of the P. t. schweinfurthii specimens had peripheral and central joint erosive disease characteristic of spondyloarthropathy. Subchondral pauciarticular distribution and reactive new bone clearly distinguish this disease from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and direct bone/joint infection. The fact that P. paniscus and P. t. troglodytes were similar in terms of disease frequency makes the notion of sexual transmission unlikely. While the frequencies of spondyloarthropathy were indistinguishable among all species/subspecies studied, the patterns of joint involvement were disparate. The Pan paniscus and P. t. troglodytes home ranges are geographically separate. We assessed possible habitat factors (e.g., exposure to specific infectious agents of diarrhea) by comparing P. paniscus and P. t. troglodytes with P. t. schweinfurthii. The latter shared similar patterns and habitats (separated by the Congo River) with P. paniscus. The explanation offered for habitat-specific patterns is differential bacterial exposure-most likely Shigella or Yersinia in P. paniscus and P. t. schweinfurthii.

The character of arthritis has not received the same attention in Pan paniscus as it has in P. troglodytes. Reactive arthritis (a form of spondyloarthropathy) in the latter has been considered to be either a sexually transmitted or an infectious-agent diarrhea-related disorder. The unique sexual promiscuity of P. paniscus enables us to distinguish between those hypotheses. The macerated skeletons of 139 adult P. paniscus, P. troglodytes troglodytes, and P. troglodytes schweinfurthii were macroscopically analyzed for osseous and articular pathologies. The sex of the animal was recorded at the time of acquisition. Twenty-one percent of the P. paniscus, 28% of the P. t. troglodytes, and 27% of the P. t. schweinfurthii specimens had peripheral and central joint erosive disease characteristic of spondyloarthropathy. Subchondral pauciarticular distribution and reactive new bone clearly distinguish this disease from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and direct bone/joint infection. The fact that P. paniscus and P. t. troglodytes were similar in terms of disease frequency makes the notion of sexual transmission unlikely. While the frequencies of spondyloarthropathy were indistinguishable among all species/subspecies studied, the patterns of joint involvement were disparate. The Pan paniscus and P. t. troglodytes home ranges are geographically separate. We assessed possible habitat factors (e.g., exposure to specific infectious agents of diarrhea) by comparing P. paniscus and P. t. troglodytes with P. t. schweinfurthii. The latter shared similar patterns and habitats (separated by the Congo River) with P. paniscus. The explanation offered for habitat-specific patterns is differential bacterial exposure-most likely Shigella or Yersinia in P. paniscus and P. t. schweinfurthii.

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2005
Deposited On:23 Mar 2010 13:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0275-2565
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ajp.20140
PubMed ID:16015657

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations