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Hyperostosis frontalis interna: archaeological evidence of possible microevolution of human sex steroids?


Rühli, Frank J; Böni, Thomas; Henneberg, Maciej (2004). Hyperostosis frontalis interna: archaeological evidence of possible microevolution of human sex steroids? HOMO : Journal of Comparative Human Biology, 55(1-2):91-99.

Abstract

Hyperostosis frontalis interna is a restricted bilateral thickening of the frontal endocranial surface, which is frequently found in postmenopausal females today. Surprisingly, this condition had a higher male prevalence in its rare archaeological records. This is again highlighted by the oldest known male European hyperostosis frontalis interna case in an adult Celtic from 100 BC presented here. This unique specimen supports earlier suggestions of the possible microevolution of human endocrine regulation, e.g. by sex steroids, and its pathoanatomical impact.

Hyperostosis frontalis interna is a restricted bilateral thickening of the frontal endocranial surface, which is frequently found in postmenopausal females today. Surprisingly, this condition had a higher male prevalence in its rare archaeological records. This is again highlighted by the oldest known male European hyperostosis frontalis interna case in an adult Celtic from 100 BC presented here. This unique specimen supports earlier suggestions of the possible microevolution of human endocrine regulation, e.g. by sex steroids, and its pathoanatomical impact.

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15 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:23 Mar 2010 08:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0018-442X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jchb.2004.04.003
PubMed ID:15553271

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