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Accelerated type III secretion system 2-dependent enteropathogenesis by a Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis PT4/6 strain


Suar, M; Periaswamy, B; Songhet, P; Misselwitz, B; Müller, A; Käppeli, R; Kremer, M; Heikenwalder, M; Hardt, W D (2009). Accelerated type III secretion system 2-dependent enteropathogenesis by a Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis PT4/6 strain. Infection and Immunity, 77(9):3569-77.

Abstract

Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are major causes of enteric disease. The pathomechanism of enteric infection by serovar Typhimurium has been studied in detail. Serovar Typhimurium employs two pathways in parallel for triggering disease, i.e., the "classical" pathway, triggered by type III secretion system 1 (TTSS-1), and the "alternative" pathway, mediated by TTSS-2. It had remained unclear whether these two pathways would also explain the enteropathogenesis of strains from other serovars. We chose the isolate P125109 of the epidemic serovar Enteritidis PT4/6, generated isogenic mutants, and studied their virulence. Using in vitro and in vivo infection experiments, a dendritic cell depletion strategy, and MyD88(-/-) knockout mice, we found that P125109 employs both the "classical" and "alternative" pathways for triggering mucosal inflammation. The "classical" pathway was phenotypically similar in serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 and in P125109. However, the kinetics of the "alternative" pathway differed significantly. Via TTSS-2, P125109 colonized the gut tissue more efficiently and triggered mucosal inflammation approximately 1 day faster than SL1344 did. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that different Salmonella spp. can differ in their capacity to trigger mucosal inflammation via the "alternative" pathway in vivo.

Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are major causes of enteric disease. The pathomechanism of enteric infection by serovar Typhimurium has been studied in detail. Serovar Typhimurium employs two pathways in parallel for triggering disease, i.e., the "classical" pathway, triggered by type III secretion system 1 (TTSS-1), and the "alternative" pathway, mediated by TTSS-2. It had remained unclear whether these two pathways would also explain the enteropathogenesis of strains from other serovars. We chose the isolate P125109 of the epidemic serovar Enteritidis PT4/6, generated isogenic mutants, and studied their virulence. Using in vitro and in vivo infection experiments, a dendritic cell depletion strategy, and MyD88(-/-) knockout mice, we found that P125109 employs both the "classical" and "alternative" pathways for triggering mucosal inflammation. The "classical" pathway was phenotypically similar in serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 and in P125109. However, the kinetics of the "alternative" pathway differed significantly. Via TTSS-2, P125109 colonized the gut tissue more efficiently and triggered mucosal inflammation approximately 1 day faster than SL1344 did. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that different Salmonella spp. can differ in their capacity to trigger mucosal inflammation via the "alternative" pathway in vivo.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2009
Deposited On:08 Mar 2010 17:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology
ISSN:0019-9567
Publisher DOI:10.1128/IAI.00511-09
PubMed ID:19528213
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-30080

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