UZH-Logo

Bio-corrosion of stainless steel by osteoclasts - in vitro evidence


Cadosch, D; Chan, E; Gautschi, O P; Simmen, H P; Filgueira, L (2009). Bio-corrosion of stainless steel by osteoclasts - in vitro evidence. Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 27(7):841-846.

Abstract

Most metals in contact with biological systems undergo corrosion by an electrochemical process. This study investigated whether human osteoclasts (OC) are able to grow on stainless steel (SS) and directly corrode the metal alloy leading to the formation of corresponding metal ions, which may cause inflammatory reactions and activate the immune system. Scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated long-term viable OC cultures and evident resorption features on the surface of SS discs on which OC were cultured for 21 days. The findings were confirmed by atomic emission spectrometry investigations showing significantly increased levels of chromium, nickel, and manganese in the supernatant of OC cultures. Furthermore, significant levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, which are considered to be major mediators of osteolysis, were revealed in the same cultures by cytometric bead array analysis. Within the present study, it was shown that human osteoclast precursors are able to grow and differentiate towards mature OC on SS. The mature cells are able to directly corrode the metal surface and release corresponding metal ions, which induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines that are known to enhance osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. Enhanced corrosion and the subsequently released metal ions may therefore result in enhanced osteolytic lesions in the peri-prosthetic bone, contributing to the aseptic loosening of the implant.

Most metals in contact with biological systems undergo corrosion by an electrochemical process. This study investigated whether human osteoclasts (OC) are able to grow on stainless steel (SS) and directly corrode the metal alloy leading to the formation of corresponding metal ions, which may cause inflammatory reactions and activate the immune system. Scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated long-term viable OC cultures and evident resorption features on the surface of SS discs on which OC were cultured for 21 days. The findings were confirmed by atomic emission spectrometry investigations showing significantly increased levels of chromium, nickel, and manganese in the supernatant of OC cultures. Furthermore, significant levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, which are considered to be major mediators of osteolysis, were revealed in the same cultures by cytometric bead array analysis. Within the present study, it was shown that human osteoclast precursors are able to grow and differentiate towards mature OC on SS. The mature cells are able to directly corrode the metal surface and release corresponding metal ions, which induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines that are known to enhance osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. Enhanced corrosion and the subsequently released metal ions may therefore result in enhanced osteolytic lesions in the peri-prosthetic bone, contributing to the aseptic loosening of the implant.

Citations

22 citations in Web of Science®
25 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Contributors:School of Anatomy and Human Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Trauma Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2009
Deposited On:09 Feb 2010 18:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0736-0266
Publisher DOI:10.1002/jor.20831
PubMed ID:19105228

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations