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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-30116

Haak, S; Croxford, A L; Kreymborg, K; Heppner, F L; Pouly, S; Becher, B; Waisman, A (2009). IL-17A and IL-17F do not contribute vitally to autoimmune neuro-inflammation in mice. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 119(1):61-69.

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Abstract

The clear association of Th17 cells with autoimmune pathogenicity implicates Th17 cytokines as critical mediators of chronic autoimmune diseases such as EAE. To study the impact of IL-17A on CNS inflammation, we generated transgenic mice in which high levels of expression of IL-17A could be initiated after Cre-mediated recombination. Although ubiquitous overexpression of IL-17A led to skin inflammation and granulocytosis, T cell-specific IL-17A overexpression did not have a perceptible impact on the development and health of the mice. In the context of EAE, neither the T cell-driven overexpression of IL-17A nor its complete loss had a major impact on the development of clinical disease. Since IL-17F may be able to compensate for the loss of IL-17A, we also generated IL-17F-deficient mice. This strain was fully susceptible to EAE and displayed unaltered emergence and expansion of autoreactive T cells during disease. To eliminate potential compensatory effects of either cytokine, we treated IL-17F-deficient mice with antagonistic monoclonal antibodies specific for IL-17A and found again only a minimal beneficial impact on disease development. We conclude therefore that both IL-17A and IL-17F, while prominently expressed by an encephalitogenic T cell population, may only marginally contribute to the development of autoimmune CNS disease.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Experimental Immunology
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:11 Feb 2010 21:57
Last Modified:28 Nov 2013 02:12
Publisher:American Society for Clinical Investigation
ISSN:0021-9738
Publisher DOI:10.1172/JCI35997
PubMed ID:19075395
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 161
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