UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Feasibility of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in paediatric patients


Valsangiacomo Büchel, Emanuela R; Balmer, C; Bauersfeld, U; Kellenberger, C J; Schwitter, J (2009). Feasibility of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in paediatric patients. Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, 11(1):51.

Abstract

AIMS: As coronary artery disease may also occur during childhood in some specific conditions, we sought to assess the feasibility and accuracy of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in paediatric patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: First-pass perfusion CMR studies were performed under pharmacological stress with adenosine and by using a hybrid echo-planar pulse sequence with slice-selective saturation recovery preparation. Fifty-six perfusion CMR examinations were performed in 47 patients. The median age was 12 years (1 month-18 years), and weight 42.8 kg (2.6-82 kg). General anaesthesia was required in 18 patients. Mean examination time was 67 +/- 19 min. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 54/56 examinations. In 23 cases the acquisition parameters were adapted to patient's size. Perfusion CMR was abnormal in 16 examinations. The perfusion defects affected the territory of the left anterior descending coronary artery in 11, of the right coronary artery in 3, and of the circumflex coronary artery in 2 cases. Compared to coronary angiography, perfusion CMR showed a sensitivity of 87% (CI 52-97%) and a specificity of 95% (CI 79-99%). CONCLUSION: In children, perfusion CMR is feasible and accurate. In very young children (less than 1 year old), diagnostic image quality may be limited.

AIMS: As coronary artery disease may also occur during childhood in some specific conditions, we sought to assess the feasibility and accuracy of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in paediatric patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: First-pass perfusion CMR studies were performed under pharmacological stress with adenosine and by using a hybrid echo-planar pulse sequence with slice-selective saturation recovery preparation. Fifty-six perfusion CMR examinations were performed in 47 patients. The median age was 12 years (1 month-18 years), and weight 42.8 kg (2.6-82 kg). General anaesthesia was required in 18 patients. Mean examination time was 67 +/- 19 min. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 54/56 examinations. In 23 cases the acquisition parameters were adapted to patient's size. Perfusion CMR was abnormal in 16 examinations. The perfusion defects affected the territory of the left anterior descending coronary artery in 11, of the right coronary artery in 3, and of the circumflex coronary artery in 2 cases. Compared to coronary angiography, perfusion CMR showed a sensitivity of 87% (CI 52-97%) and a specificity of 95% (CI 79-99%). CONCLUSION: In children, perfusion CMR is feasible and accurate. In very young children (less than 1 year old), diagnostic image quality may be limited.

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

57 downloads since deposited on 16 Feb 2010
12 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:16 Feb 2010 14:25
Last Modified:07 Sep 2016 12:22
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1097-6647
Publisher DOI:10.1186/1532-429X-11-51
PubMed ID:19948020
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-30447

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations