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Size-dependent energetics of metamorphosis in the yellow dung fly, Scathophaga stercoraria


Reim, C; Kaufmann, C; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U (2009). Size-dependent energetics of metamorphosis in the yellow dung fly, Scathophaga stercoraria. Evolutionary Ecology Research, 11:1111-1130.

Abstract

Competing hypotheses: (1) Large body size confers more efficient energy use (relative efficiency hypothesis). (2) Large body size requires more energy to be sustained, a disadvantage when food is limited (absolute energy demand hypothesis).
Organism: Yellow dung flies, Scathophaga stercoraria (Diptera: Scathophagidae), artificially selected for large and small body size in the laboratory for 24 generations to augment the available phenotypic body sizes.
Methods: Larvae were reared under limited and unlimited food (dung) conditions, and the energy content of pupae was measured at the beginning and the end of the pupal stage in different, size-matched individuals.
Conclusions: Over the pupal period, lipids and glycogen decreased whereas sugar content increased. Net energy loss per unit body mass was higher at unlimited food. Contrary to expectation, males (the larger sex) lost less energy than females. Large selection line pupae showed the highest absolute and mass-specific energy loss during metamorphosis, indicating a correlated physiological response to body size selection because phenotypic body sizes do not differ between the lines at limited dung. We conclude that energetic costs due to greater absolute energy demand of larger individuals during the pupal phase outweigh the benefits due to greater metabolic efficiency.

Competing hypotheses: (1) Large body size confers more efficient energy use (relative efficiency hypothesis). (2) Large body size requires more energy to be sustained, a disadvantage when food is limited (absolute energy demand hypothesis).
Organism: Yellow dung flies, Scathophaga stercoraria (Diptera: Scathophagidae), artificially selected for large and small body size in the laboratory for 24 generations to augment the available phenotypic body sizes.
Methods: Larvae were reared under limited and unlimited food (dung) conditions, and the energy content of pupae was measured at the beginning and the end of the pupal stage in different, size-matched individuals.
Conclusions: Over the pupal period, lipids and glycogen decreased whereas sugar content increased. Net energy loss per unit body mass was higher at unlimited food. Contrary to expectation, males (the larger sex) lost less energy than females. Large selection line pupae showed the highest absolute and mass-specific energy loss during metamorphosis, indicating a correlated physiological response to body size selection because phenotypic body sizes do not differ between the lines at limited dung. We conclude that energetic costs due to greater absolute energy demand of larger individuals during the pupal phase outweigh the benefits due to greater metabolic efficiency.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:14 Feb 2010 14:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:54
Publisher:Evolutionary Ecology Ltd
ISSN:1522-0613
Official URL:http://www.evolutionary-ecology.com/v1.html
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-30455

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