UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Fracture strength of endodontically-treated teeth restored with post and cores and composite cores only


Özcan, Mutlu; Valandro, L F (2009). Fracture strength of endodontically-treated teeth restored with post and cores and composite cores only. Operative Dentistry, 34(4):429-436.

Abstract

This study compared the fracture strength of different conditioned metallic posts, fiber-reinforced-composite posts and composite cores only in teeth without coronal tooth structure and determined failure modes after the fracture test. Post spaces were prepared in the root canals, and the teeth were randomly divided into seven experimental groups: Gr1: Titanium posts (ParaPost) + Silano-Pen (Bredent) + silane; Gr2: Titanium posts + 30 microm CoJet-Sand (3M ESPE) + silane; Gr3: Titanium posts + 50 microm Al2O3 + V-primer (Sun Medical); Gr4: Titanium posts + 50 microm Al2O3 + Alloy primer (Kuraray); Gr5: E-glass FRC post (EverStick); Gr6: Polyethylene fiber (Ribbond) + Resin impregnation and Gr7: Resin composite core only, with no posts. The posts were cemented using Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray); coronal parts of the roots were etched, primed, bonded and composite cores were built-up. After thermocycling (5 degrees C-55 degrees C, 6000x), the fracture strength test was performed. The fracture strength of titanium posts (408 +/- 122 - 550 +/- 149 N) was significantly higher (p<0.05) than that of FRC posts (321 +/- 131 and 267 +/- 108 N for Everstick and Ribbond, respectively) or the group without posts (175 +/- 70 N) (Gr7) (ANOVA, Tukey's test). The group without posts resulted in complete core detachment (100%). In the E-glass FRC group, 60% adhesive core fracture occurred, covering >1/3 of the core and, in the polyethylene FRC group, 100% post-core detachment at the canal opening was observed. In all the titanium post applied groups (Gr1-Gr4), the posts remained in place with partial detachment of the core material from the post surface at varying degrees, depending on the conditioning method used. When no coronal tooth structure exist, the metal posts showed higher fracture strength values as opposed to the FRC post or no-post approach.

Abstract

This study compared the fracture strength of different conditioned metallic posts, fiber-reinforced-composite posts and composite cores only in teeth without coronal tooth structure and determined failure modes after the fracture test. Post spaces were prepared in the root canals, and the teeth were randomly divided into seven experimental groups: Gr1: Titanium posts (ParaPost) + Silano-Pen (Bredent) + silane; Gr2: Titanium posts + 30 microm CoJet-Sand (3M ESPE) + silane; Gr3: Titanium posts + 50 microm Al2O3 + V-primer (Sun Medical); Gr4: Titanium posts + 50 microm Al2O3 + Alloy primer (Kuraray); Gr5: E-glass FRC post (EverStick); Gr6: Polyethylene fiber (Ribbond) + Resin impregnation and Gr7: Resin composite core only, with no posts. The posts were cemented using Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray); coronal parts of the roots were etched, primed, bonded and composite cores were built-up. After thermocycling (5 degrees C-55 degrees C, 6000x), the fracture strength test was performed. The fracture strength of titanium posts (408 +/- 122 - 550 +/- 149 N) was significantly higher (p<0.05) than that of FRC posts (321 +/- 131 and 267 +/- 108 N for Everstick and Ribbond, respectively) or the group without posts (175 +/- 70 N) (Gr7) (ANOVA, Tukey's test). The group without posts resulted in complete core detachment (100%). In the E-glass FRC group, 60% adhesive core fracture occurred, covering >1/3 of the core and, in the polyethylene FRC group, 100% post-core detachment at the canal opening was observed. In all the titanium post applied groups (Gr1-Gr4), the posts remained in place with partial detachment of the core material from the post surface at varying degrees, depending on the conditioning method used. When no coronal tooth structure exist, the metal posts showed higher fracture strength values as opposed to the FRC post or no-post approach.

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

7 downloads since deposited on 12 Feb 2010
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:12 Feb 2010 13:20
Last Modified:01 Dec 2016 09:53
Publisher:Academy of Operative Dentistry
ISSN:0361-7734
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2341/08-110
Related URLs:http://www.jopdentonline.org/ (Publisher)
PubMed ID:19678448

Download

[img]
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations