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Fracture Epidemiology Among Individuals 75+


Bischoff-Ferrari, H A (2009). Fracture Epidemiology Among Individuals 75+. In: Bischoff-Ferrari, H A. Osteoporosis in Older Persons. London: Springer, 97-109.

Abstract

Fractures contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in older individuals. Among individuals age 60 years and older, the mortality-adjusted residual lifetime risk of fracture has been estimated to be 44–65% for women and 25–42% for men (1). After age 75, hip fractures are the most frequent fractures, and up to 50% of older individuals suffering a hip fracture will have permanent functional disability, 15–25% will require long-term nursing home care, and up to 20% will die within the first year after the event (2–4). The exponential increase in hip fractures after age 75 translates into an estimated 1 in 3 women, and 1 in 6 men, who will have sustained a hip fracture by their 90th decade (5). Consequently, hip fractures account for substantial and increasing health care expenses with annual costs in the United States projected to increase from 7.2 billion in 1990 to 16 billion in 2020 (6).

Fractures contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in older individuals. Among individuals age 60 years and older, the mortality-adjusted residual lifetime risk of fracture has been estimated to be 44–65% for women and 25–42% for men (1). After age 75, hip fractures are the most frequent fractures, and up to 50% of older individuals suffering a hip fracture will have permanent functional disability, 15–25% will require long-term nursing home care, and up to 20% will die within the first year after the event (2–4). The exponential increase in hip fractures after age 75 translates into an estimated 1 in 3 women, and 1 in 6 men, who will have sustained a hip fracture by their 90th decade (5). Consequently, hip fractures account for substantial and increasing health care expenses with annual costs in the United States projected to increase from 7.2 billion in 1990 to 16 billion in 2020 (6).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Geriatric Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
360 Social problems & social services
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Date:13 October 2009
Deposited On:12 Feb 2010 06:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:54
Publisher:Springer
ISBN:978-1-84628-515-8 (P) 978-1-84628-697-1 (O)
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/978-1-84628-697-1_8

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