UZH-Logo

Health technology assessment in Switzerland


Koch, P; Schilling, J; Läubli, M; Mitscherlich, F; Melchart, D; Bellucci, S (2009). Health technology assessment in Switzerland. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 25(Suppl ):174-177.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: To review Switzerland's mixed public and private healthcare system with regard to health technology assessment (HTA). RESULTS: In the past, remarkable work in HTA was done. Accomplishments include the following: (i) Switzerland became an early member of the International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment. (ii) HTA has its legal bases in terms of effectiveness, appropriateness, and efficiency. (iii) The federal law allows the introduction of new technologies for a limited time for evaluation. (iv) A Swiss Network for Health Technology Assessment was established. In 2004, federal HTA activities moved from the Swiss Federal Office "of Social Security" to the one for "Public Health." The Office mainly mandates, manages, and coordinates evaluations attached to its prevention and intervention sections in the fields of AIDS, illegal drugs, and legal drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the absence of a governmental institution assessing and reporting on new health technologies, private and for profit organizations became more important for the decision-making processes. In a regulated market, the implications may be crucial for the public health.

OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: To review Switzerland's mixed public and private healthcare system with regard to health technology assessment (HTA). RESULTS: In the past, remarkable work in HTA was done. Accomplishments include the following: (i) Switzerland became an early member of the International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment. (ii) HTA has its legal bases in terms of effectiveness, appropriateness, and efficiency. (iii) The federal law allows the introduction of new technologies for a limited time for evaluation. (iv) A Swiss Network for Health Technology Assessment was established. In 2004, federal HTA activities moved from the Swiss Federal Office "of Social Security" to the one for "Public Health." The Office mainly mandates, manages, and coordinates evaluations attached to its prevention and intervention sections in the fields of AIDS, illegal drugs, and legal drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the absence of a governmental institution assessing and reporting on new health technologies, private and for profit organizations became more important for the decision-making processes. In a regulated market, the implications may be crucial for the public health.

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

130 downloads since deposited on 17 Mar 2010
26 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Complementary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:17 Mar 2010 09:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:54
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0266-4623
Additional Information:Copyright: Cambridge University Press
Publisher DOI:10.1017/S0266462309090606
PubMed ID:19534839
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-30487

Download

[img]
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations