UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Effective, low-titer antibody protection against low-dose repeated mucosal SHIV challenge in macaques


Hessell, A J; Poignard, P; Hunter, M; Hangartner, L; Tehrani, D M; Bleeker, W K; Parren, P W H I; Marx, P A; Burton, D R (2009). Effective, low-titer antibody protection against low-dose repeated mucosal SHIV challenge in macaques. Nature Medicine, 15(8):951-954.

Abstract

Neutralizing antibodies are thought to be crucial for HIV vaccine protection, but studies in animal models suggest that high antibody concentrations are required. This is a major potential hurdle for vaccine design. However, these studies typically apply a large virus inoculum to ensure infection in control animals in single-challenge experiments. In contrast, most human infection via sexual encounter probably involves repeated exposures to much lower doses of virus. Therefore, animal studies may have provided an overestimate of the levels of antibodies required for protection in humans. We investigated whether plasma concentrations of antibody corresponding to relatively modest neutralization titers in vitro could protect macaques from repeated intravaginal exposure to low doses of a simian immunodeficiency virus-HIV chimera (SHIV) that uses the CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) co-receptor. An effector function-deficient variant of the neutralizing antibody was also included. The results show that a substantially larger number of challenges is required to infect macaques treated with neutralizing antibody than control antibody-treated macaques, and support the notion that effector function may contribute to antibody protection. Overall, the results imply that lower amounts of antibody than previously considered protective may provide benefit in the context of typical human exposure to HIV-1.

Abstract

Neutralizing antibodies are thought to be crucial for HIV vaccine protection, but studies in animal models suggest that high antibody concentrations are required. This is a major potential hurdle for vaccine design. However, these studies typically apply a large virus inoculum to ensure infection in control animals in single-challenge experiments. In contrast, most human infection via sexual encounter probably involves repeated exposures to much lower doses of virus. Therefore, animal studies may have provided an overestimate of the levels of antibodies required for protection in humans. We investigated whether plasma concentrations of antibody corresponding to relatively modest neutralization titers in vitro could protect macaques from repeated intravaginal exposure to low doses of a simian immunodeficiency virus-HIV chimera (SHIV) that uses the CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) co-receptor. An effector function-deficient variant of the neutralizing antibody was also included. The results show that a substantially larger number of challenges is required to infect macaques treated with neutralizing antibody than control antibody-treated macaques, and support the notion that effector function may contribute to antibody protection. Overall, the results imply that lower amounts of antibody than previously considered protective may provide benefit in the context of typical human exposure to HIV-1.

Citations

298 citations in Web of Science®
305 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 12 Feb 2010
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Date:August 2009
Deposited On:12 Feb 2010 09:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:55
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1078-8956
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.1974
PubMed ID:19525965

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations