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Intramolecular backfolding of the carboxyl-terminal end of MxA protein is a prerequisite for its oligomerization


Di Paolo, C; Hefti, H P; Meli, M; Landis, H; Pavlovic, J (1999). Intramolecular backfolding of the carboxyl-terminal end of MxA protein is a prerequisite for its oligomerization. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 274(45):32071-32078.

Abstract

Mx proteins are large GTPases, which play a pivotal role in the interferon type I-mediated response against viral infections. The human MxA inhibits the replication of several RNA viruses and is organized in oligomeric structures. Using two different experimental approaches, the mammalian two-hybrid system and an interaction dependent nuclear translocation approach, three domains in the carboxyl-terminal moiety were identified that are involved in the oligomerization of MxA. The first consists of a carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix (LZ1), which binds to a more proximal part of the same molecule. This intramolecular backfolding is a prerequisite for the formation of an intermolecular complex. This intermolecular interaction is mediated by two domains, a poorly defined region generated by the intramolecular interaction and a domain located between amino acids 363 and 415. Co-expression of wild-type MxA with various mutant fragments thereof revealed that the presence of the carboxyl-terminal region comprising the amphipathic helices LZ1 and LZ2 is necessary and sufficient to exert a dominant negative effect. This finding suggests that the functional interference of the carboxyl-terminal region is due to competition for binding of an as yet unidentified cellular or viral target molecules.

Mx proteins are large GTPases, which play a pivotal role in the interferon type I-mediated response against viral infections. The human MxA inhibits the replication of several RNA viruses and is organized in oligomeric structures. Using two different experimental approaches, the mammalian two-hybrid system and an interaction dependent nuclear translocation approach, three domains in the carboxyl-terminal moiety were identified that are involved in the oligomerization of MxA. The first consists of a carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix (LZ1), which binds to a more proximal part of the same molecule. This intramolecular backfolding is a prerequisite for the formation of an intermolecular complex. This intermolecular interaction is mediated by two domains, a poorly defined region generated by the intramolecular interaction and a domain located between amino acids 363 and 415. Co-expression of wild-type MxA with various mutant fragments thereof revealed that the presence of the carboxyl-terminal region comprising the amphipathic helices LZ1 and LZ2 is necessary and sufficient to exert a dominant negative effect. This finding suggests that the functional interference of the carboxyl-terminal region is due to competition for binding of an as yet unidentified cellular or viral target molecules.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1999
Deposited On:11 Aug 2008 15:51
Last Modified:26 Aug 2016 07:32
Publisher:American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
ISSN:0021-9258
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1074/jbc.274.45.32071
PubMed ID:10542240
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3064

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