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Simulation of forest radiance at top-of-atmosphere level using coupled radiative transfer models


Laurent, V C E; Clevers, J G P W; Schaepman, M E; Verhoef, W (2009). Simulation of forest radiance at top-of-atmosphere level using coupled radiative transfer models. In: 6th EARSeL Imaging Spectroscopy SIG workshop , Tel Aviv, Israel, 16 March 2009 - 18 March 2009.

Abstract

Three radiative transfer models were coupled to simulate forest radiances at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) level:
1) the PROSPECT leaf model, 2) the 4SAIL2 canopy model which includes the hotspot and clumping effects, and 3) the MODTRAN atmospheric radiative transfer model. The output of the coupled model can be compared to radiances measured at satellite level. The study area consisted of two Norway spruce stands in Eastern Czech Republic. The field data were collected in the first half of September 2006 and the CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) data were acquired on September 22, 2006. The coupled model was applied for the two stands, using a single set of
atmospheric parameters for the four available CHRIS viewing directions. The simulated TOA radiances were systematically too high compared to the CHRIS data, for the four viewing
directions. However, the simulated spectral and directional trends matched those measured by CHRIS. After investigation, it was found that the reflectance values simulated by the coupled model at the top of the canopy
(TOC) were too high and caused the TOA radiances to be too high. Further research will therefore focus on
improving the simulation of the TOC reflectances.

Three radiative transfer models were coupled to simulate forest radiances at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) level:
1) the PROSPECT leaf model, 2) the 4SAIL2 canopy model which includes the hotspot and clumping effects, and 3) the MODTRAN atmospheric radiative transfer model. The output of the coupled model can be compared to radiances measured at satellite level. The study area consisted of two Norway spruce stands in Eastern Czech Republic. The field data were collected in the first half of September 2006 and the CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) data were acquired on September 22, 2006. The coupled model was applied for the two stands, using a single set of
atmospheric parameters for the four available CHRIS viewing directions. The simulated TOA radiances were systematically too high compared to the CHRIS data, for the four viewing
directions. However, the simulated spectral and directional trends matched those measured by CHRIS. After investigation, it was found that the reflectance values simulated by the coupled model at the top of the canopy
(TOC) were too high and caused the TOA radiances to be too high. Further research will therefore focus on
improving the simulation of the TOC reflectances.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Event End Date:18 March 2009
Deposited On:16 Feb 2010 10:42
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:55
Additional Information:Proceedings of the 6th EARSeL SIG IS workshop IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY: Innovative tool for scientific and commercial environmental applications, Tel Aviv, Israel, 16-18 March 2009
Official URL:http://www.earsel6th.tau.ac.il/~earsel6/CD/
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-30694

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