UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Disc formation and the origin of clumpy galaxies at high redshift


Agertz, O; Teyssier, R; Moore, B (2009). Disc formation and the origin of clumpy galaxies at high redshift. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 397(1):L64-L68.

Abstract

Observations of high-redshift galaxies have revealed a multitude of large clumpy rapidly star-forming galaxies. Their formation scenario and their link to present-day spirals are still unknown. In this Letter, we perform adaptive mesh refinement simulations of disc formation in a cosmological context that are unrivalled in terms of mass and spatial resolution. We find that the so-called 'chain-galaxies' and 'clump-clusters' are a natural outcome of early epochs of enhanced gas accretion from cold dense streams as well as tidally and ram-pressured stripped material from minor mergers and satellites. Through interaction with the hot halo gas, this freshly accreted cold gas settles into a large disc-like system, not necessarily aligned to an older stellar component, that undergoes fragmentation and subsequent star formation, forming large clumps in the mass range 107–109 M⊙ . Galaxy formation is a complex process at this important epoch when most of the central baryons are being acquired through a range of different mechanisms – we highlight that a rapid mass loading epoch is required to fuel the fragmentation taking place in the massive arms in the outskirts of extended discs, an accretion mode that occurs naturally in the hierarchical assembly process at early epochs.

Observations of high-redshift galaxies have revealed a multitude of large clumpy rapidly star-forming galaxies. Their formation scenario and their link to present-day spirals are still unknown. In this Letter, we perform adaptive mesh refinement simulations of disc formation in a cosmological context that are unrivalled in terms of mass and spatial resolution. We find that the so-called 'chain-galaxies' and 'clump-clusters' are a natural outcome of early epochs of enhanced gas accretion from cold dense streams as well as tidally and ram-pressured stripped material from minor mergers and satellites. Through interaction with the hot halo gas, this freshly accreted cold gas settles into a large disc-like system, not necessarily aligned to an older stellar component, that undergoes fragmentation and subsequent star formation, forming large clumps in the mass range 107–109 M⊙ . Galaxy formation is a complex process at this important epoch when most of the central baryons are being acquired through a range of different mechanisms – we highlight that a rapid mass loading epoch is required to fuel the fragmentation taking place in the massive arms in the outskirts of extended discs, an accretion mode that occurs naturally in the hierarchical assembly process at early epochs.

Citations

144 citations in Web of Science®
142 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

37 downloads since deposited on 26 Feb 2010
17 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute for Computational Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Uncontrolled Keywords:galaxies: evolution; galaxies: formation; galaxies: haloes
Language:English
Date:July 2009
Deposited On:26 Feb 2010 13:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:56
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0035-8711
Additional Information:The attached file is a preprint (accepted version) of an article published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1745-3933.2009.00685.x
Related URLs:http://arxiv.org/abs/0901.2536
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-30869

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF (Accepted manuscript, Version 2)
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF (Accepted manuscript, Version 1)
Size: 273kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations