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Is cancer prevention ever going to be profitable?


Szucs, Thomas D; Dedes, Konstantin J (2009). Is cancer prevention ever going to be profitable? In: Senn, H J; Kapp, U; Ott, F. Cancer Prevention II. Berlin: Springer, 41-47.

Abstract

Undoubtedly, the war on cancer is an expensive endeavour. It is estimated that, where data are available in Europe (e.g. Germany and France), cancer care accounts for a similar proportion of overall health-care expenditure to that in the USA, i.e. approximately 5%. Currently, no society can afford all of the potential cancer treatments for all the patients that could benefit from them. How the required resources should be provided is one of the great on-going debates, and different countries approach this problem in different ways. Additionally, the more we understand about the pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, the more options are created. Many of these options are new diagnostic tools and more effective treatments. Obviously these innovations, paired with an increasing patient pool, are leading to tremendous health-care expenditures, well surpassing current budgets. Hence, the question arises of how many resources should be devoted to the management of cancers, given that resources are scarce and many other fields and specialities are competing for these resources. This paper addresses the question of whether preventive measures in oncology eventually pay off.

Undoubtedly, the war on cancer is an expensive endeavour. It is estimated that, where data are available in Europe (e.g. Germany and France), cancer care accounts for a similar proportion of overall health-care expenditure to that in the USA, i.e. approximately 5%. Currently, no society can afford all of the potential cancer treatments for all the patients that could benefit from them. How the required resources should be provided is one of the great on-going debates, and different countries approach this problem in different ways. Additionally, the more we understand about the pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, the more options are created. Many of these options are new diagnostic tools and more effective treatments. Obviously these innovations, paired with an increasing patient pool, are leading to tremendous health-care expenditures, well surpassing current budgets. Hence, the question arises of how many resources should be devoted to the management of cancers, given that resources are scarce and many other fields and specialities are competing for these resources. This paper addresses the question of whether preventive measures in oncology eventually pay off.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gynecology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:28 November 2009
Deposited On:17 Feb 2010 07:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:56
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Recent Results in Cancer Research
ISBN:978-3-540-69296-6 (P) 978-3-540-69297-3 (O)
Publisher DOI:10.1007/978-3-540-69297-3_4
PubMed ID:19213555
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-30948

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