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Pa-AGOG, the founding member of a new family of archaeal 8-oxoguanine DNA-glycosylases


Sartori, A A; Lingaraju, G M; Hunziker, P; Winkler, F K; Jiricny, J (2004). Pa-AGOG, the founding member of a new family of archaeal 8-oxoguanine DNA-glycosylases. Nucleic Acids Research, 32(22):6531-6539.

Abstract

Oxidative damage represents a major threat to genomic stability, as the major product of DNA oxidation, 8-oxoguanine (GO), frequently mispairs with adenine during replication. In order to prevent these mutagenic events, organisms have evolved GO-DNA glycosylases that remove this oxidized base from DNA. We were interested to find out how GO is processed in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum, which lives at temperatures around 100 degrees C. To this end, we searched its genome for open reading frames (ORFs) bearing the principal hallmark of GO-DNA glycosylases: a helix-hairpin-helix motif and a glycine/proline-rich sequence followed by an absolutely conserved aspartate (HhH-GPD motif). Interestingly, although the P.aerophilum genome encodes three such ORFs, none of these encodes the potent GO-processing activity detected in P.aerophilum extracts. Fractionation of the extracts, followed by analysis of the active fractions by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, showed that the GO-processing enzyme has a molecular size of approximately 30 kDa. Mass spectrometric analysis of proteins in this size range identified several peptides originating from P.aerophilum ORF PAE2237. We now show that PAE2237 encodes AGOG (Archaeal GO-Glycosylase), the founding member of a new family of DNA glycosylases, which can remove GO from single- and double-stranded substrates with great efficiency.

Oxidative damage represents a major threat to genomic stability, as the major product of DNA oxidation, 8-oxoguanine (GO), frequently mispairs with adenine during replication. In order to prevent these mutagenic events, organisms have evolved GO-DNA glycosylases that remove this oxidized base from DNA. We were interested to find out how GO is processed in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum, which lives at temperatures around 100 degrees C. To this end, we searched its genome for open reading frames (ORFs) bearing the principal hallmark of GO-DNA glycosylases: a helix-hairpin-helix motif and a glycine/proline-rich sequence followed by an absolutely conserved aspartate (HhH-GPD motif). Interestingly, although the P.aerophilum genome encodes three such ORFs, none of these encodes the potent GO-processing activity detected in P.aerophilum extracts. Fractionation of the extracts, followed by analysis of the active fractions by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, showed that the GO-processing enzyme has a molecular size of approximately 30 kDa. Mass spectrometric analysis of proteins in this size range identified several peptides originating from P.aerophilum ORF PAE2237. We now show that PAE2237 encodes AGOG (Archaeal GO-Glycosylase), the founding member of a new family of DNA glycosylases, which can remove GO from single- and double-stranded substrates with great efficiency.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:09 Jul 2010 07:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:57
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0305-1048
Publisher DOI:10.1093/nar/gkh995
PubMed ID:15604455
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-31223

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