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Protective immunity against Helicobacter is characterized by a unique transcriptional signature


Mueller, A; O'Rourke, J; Chu, P; Kim, C C; Sutton, Philip; Lee, A; Falkow, S (2003). Protective immunity against Helicobacter is characterized by a unique transcriptional signature. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), 100(21):12289-12294.

Abstract

Immunization with a whole-cell sonicate vaccine of Helicobacter felis in conjunction with cholera toxin as a mucosal adjuvant induces long-term protective immunity in a majority of laboratory mice. We have combined gene expression profiling and immunohistochemical analysis on a set of immunized animals to better understand the mechanism of protection. The stomachs of protected animals exhibited a strikingly different transcriptional profile compared with those of nonprotected or control mice, indicating that vaccination targets the appropriate site and leaves a molecular signature. Among the genes whose up-regulation is significantly correlated with protection are a number of adipocyte-specific factors. These include the fat-cell-specific cytokines adipsin, resistin, and adiponectin and the adipocyte surface marker CD36. Interestingly, potentially protective T and B lymphocytes can be found embedded in the adipose tissue surrounding protected stomachs but never in control or unprotected stomachs. Adipsin-specific immunohistochemical staining of protected stomach sections further revealed molecular cross-talk between adjacent lymphoid and adipose cell populations. We propose a mechanism of protection that involves the effector responses of either or both lymphocyte subclasses as well as the previously unappreciated paracrine functions of adipose tissue surrounding the resident lymphocytes.

Immunization with a whole-cell sonicate vaccine of Helicobacter felis in conjunction with cholera toxin as a mucosal adjuvant induces long-term protective immunity in a majority of laboratory mice. We have combined gene expression profiling and immunohistochemical analysis on a set of immunized animals to better understand the mechanism of protection. The stomachs of protected animals exhibited a strikingly different transcriptional profile compared with those of nonprotected or control mice, indicating that vaccination targets the appropriate site and leaves a molecular signature. Among the genes whose up-regulation is significantly correlated with protection are a number of adipocyte-specific factors. These include the fat-cell-specific cytokines adipsin, resistin, and adiponectin and the adipocyte surface marker CD36. Interestingly, potentially protective T and B lymphocytes can be found embedded in the adipose tissue surrounding protected stomachs but never in control or unprotected stomachs. Adipsin-specific immunohistochemical staining of protected stomach sections further revealed molecular cross-talk between adjacent lymphoid and adipose cell populations. We propose a mechanism of protection that involves the effector responses of either or both lymphocyte subclasses as well as the previously unappreciated paracrine functions of adipose tissue surrounding the resident lymphocytes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2003
Deposited On:09 Jul 2010 07:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:57
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1635231100
PubMed ID:14528007
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-31236

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