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Estimating survival and temporary emigration in the multistate capture-recapture framework


Schaub, M; Gimenez, O; Schmidt, B R; Pradel, R (2004). Estimating survival and temporary emigration in the multistate capture-recapture framework. Ecology, 85(8):2107-2113.

Abstract

The open population Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) capture–mark–recapture model for estimating survival allows for random temporary emigration from the sampling area, but Markovian temporary emigration can bias estimates of survival. We explore a multistate capture–recapture model that has been proposed for coping with Markovian temporary emigration. We provide a comprehensive assessment of the performance of this model using computer algebra and simulation. We found that most model parameters were identifiable unless survival, emigration, and immigration were all time dependent. Simulation results showed that intrinsically identifiable parameters were estimated without bias and that precision of survival estimates was always high. When temporary emigration was Markovian, precision of estimates of emigration, immigration, and recapture probabilities was acceptable; otherwise it was not. Test component 2.Ct of the goodness-of-fit test for the CJS model had good power to detect Markovian temporary emigration. We conclude that the multistate model works well when temporary emigration is Markovian (i.e., when the CJS model should not be used) and when survival and recapture probabilities are high.

The open population Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) capture–mark–recapture model for estimating survival allows for random temporary emigration from the sampling area, but Markovian temporary emigration can bias estimates of survival. We explore a multistate capture–recapture model that has been proposed for coping with Markovian temporary emigration. We provide a comprehensive assessment of the performance of this model using computer algebra and simulation. We found that most model parameters were identifiable unless survival, emigration, and immigration were all time dependent. Simulation results showed that intrinsically identifiable parameters were estimated without bias and that precision of survival estimates was always high. When temporary emigration was Markovian, precision of estimates of emigration, immigration, and recapture probabilities was acceptable; otherwise it was not. Test component 2.Ct of the goodness-of-fit test for the CJS model had good power to detect Markovian temporary emigration. We conclude that the multistate model works well when temporary emigration is Markovian (i.e., when the CJS model should not be used) and when survival and recapture probabilities are high.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:13
Publisher:Ecological Society of America
ISSN:0012-9658
Additional Information:Copyright by the Ecological Society of America
Publisher DOI:10.1890/03-3110
Official URL:http://www.esajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1890/03-3110
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-314

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