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Antioxidant activity and sex differences of acute vascular effects of amiodarone in advanced atherosclerosis


Traupe, T; Keller, M; Fojtu, E; Bhattacharya, I; Lang, M; Ha, H R; Jochum, W; Mundy, A L; Barton, M (2007). Antioxidant activity and sex differences of acute vascular effects of amiodarone in advanced atherosclerosis. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 50(5):578-584.

Abstract

Sexual dimorphisms of atherosclerosis and the susceptibility to arrhythmias and antiarrhythmic treatment have been reported. This study investigated acute effects of amiodarone on endothelium-dependent relaxation in the aorta of male and female apoE0 mice with advanced atherosclerosis. Amiodarone tissue uptake was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and xanthine oxidase-dependent superoxide anion formation was investigated in vitro in presence or absence of amiodarone. Incubation with amiodarone for 30 min improved endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was associated with rapid vascular accumulation of amiodarone (P < 0.001) that was sex-dependent. In males, reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation was improved by amiodarone (from 88 +/- 3% to 100 +/- 2%, P < 0.01). Spontaneous phasic contractions, which were greater in females than in males (P < 0.001), were completely abolished by amiodarone (P < 0.0001). Amiodarone also inhibited generation of superoxide anion (P < 0.0001). These data show that amiodarone rapidly accumulates in atherosclerotic vascular tissue, abolishes vascular autorhythmicity, and improves endothelium-dependent function in atherosclerotic arteries. Antioxidant and vasodilator effects following amiodarone administration may contribute to its antiarrhythmic effects.

Sexual dimorphisms of atherosclerosis and the susceptibility to arrhythmias and antiarrhythmic treatment have been reported. This study investigated acute effects of amiodarone on endothelium-dependent relaxation in the aorta of male and female apoE0 mice with advanced atherosclerosis. Amiodarone tissue uptake was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and xanthine oxidase-dependent superoxide anion formation was investigated in vitro in presence or absence of amiodarone. Incubation with amiodarone for 30 min improved endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was associated with rapid vascular accumulation of amiodarone (P < 0.001) that was sex-dependent. In males, reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation was improved by amiodarone (from 88 +/- 3% to 100 +/- 2%, P < 0.01). Spontaneous phasic contractions, which were greater in females than in males (P < 0.001), were completely abolished by amiodarone (P < 0.0001). Amiodarone also inhibited generation of superoxide anion (P < 0.0001). These data show that amiodarone rapidly accumulates in atherosclerotic vascular tissue, abolishes vascular autorhythmicity, and improves endothelium-dependent function in atherosclerotic arteries. Antioxidant and vasodilator effects following amiodarone administration may contribute to its antiarrhythmic effects.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2007
Deposited On:22 Aug 2008 14:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:26
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0160-2446
Publisher DOI:10.1097/FJC.0b013e31814d6674
PubMed ID:18030069

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