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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-31536

Knechtle, B; Knechtle, P; Andonie, J L; Kohler, G (2009). Body composition, energy, and fluid turnover in a five-day multistage ultratriathlon: a case study. Research in Sports Medicine, 17(2):104-120.

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Abstract

A multistage ultraendurance triathlon over five times the Ironman distance within five consecutive days leads in one ultraendurance triathlete to minimal changes in body mass (BM; -0.3 kg), fat mass (FM; -1.9 kg), skeletal muscle mass (SM; no change), and total body water (TBW; +1.5 l). This might be explained by the continuously slower race times throughout the race every day and the positive energy balance (8,095 kcal), although he suffered an average energy deficit of -1,848 kcal per Ironman distance. The increase of TBW might be explained by the increase of plasma volume (PV) in the first 3 days. The increase of PV and TBW could be a result of an increase of sodium, which was increased after every stage. We presume that this could be the result of an increased activity of aldosterone.

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1 citation in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:19 Mar 2010 12:40
Last Modified:28 Nov 2013 00:20
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1543-8627
Additional Information:This is an electronic version of an article published in Research in Sports Medicine Volume 17, Issue 2 April 2009 , pages 95 - 111. Research in Sports Medicine is available online at http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a911762625
Publisher DOI:10.1080/15438620902900260
PubMed ID:19479629

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