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Environmental autocorrelation: curse or blessing?


Schiegg, K (2003). Environmental autocorrelation: curse or blessing? Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 18(5):212-214.

Abstract

Theory of population dynamics predicts that environmental autocorrelation increases extinction risk. Recent work by Engen and colleagues confirms this and demonstrates how the spatial extent of population synchrony is
influenced by dispersal. However, in a new study, Gonzalez and Holt demonstrate that environmental autocorrelation causes substantial increases in the size of
populations with negative growth rates, provided that they are sustained by immigrating dispersers. These new findings could change our view of dispersal and sink populations, whilst providing an explanation for previously enigmatic population outbreaks.

Theory of population dynamics predicts that environmental autocorrelation increases extinction risk. Recent work by Engen and colleagues confirms this and demonstrates how the spatial extent of population synchrony is
influenced by dispersal. However, in a new study, Gonzalez and Holt demonstrate that environmental autocorrelation causes substantial increases in the size of
populations with negative growth rates, provided that they are sustained by immigrating dispersers. These new findings could change our view of dispersal and sink populations, whilst providing an explanation for previously enigmatic population outbreaks.

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2003
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:13
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0169-5347
Publisher DOI:10.1016/S0169-5347(03)00074-0

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