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Clinical experience with Adalimumab in a multicenter Swiss cohort of patients with Crohn's disease


Nichita, C; Stelle, M; Vavricka, S; El-Wafa Ali, A; Ballabeni, P; de Saussure, P; Straumann, A; Rogler, G; Michetti, P (2010). Clinical experience with Adalimumab in a multicenter Swiss cohort of patients with Crohn's disease. Digestion, 81(2):78-85.

Abstract

Background: Controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease (CD), but there is, however, only limited long-term experience with adalimumab in daily practice. Aim: To assess the long-term effectiveness and safety of adalimumab in a multicenter cohort of practice-based patients with moderate-to-severe CD. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of CD patients who received adalimumab over a 3-year period. Disease severity was scored using the Harvey-Bradshaw index (HBI). Remission was defined as an HBI of </=4 and response as a reduction in the HBI of >3 points at evaluation compared to the baseline. Univariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictive variables associated with response. Results: The charts of 55 patients were reviewed; remission and response rates observed at weeks 4-6 were 52.7 and 83.6%, respectively. Remission was maintained at weeks 12, 24 and 52 in 89.6, 72.4 and 44.7% of patients, respectively. Remission and response rates were not influenced by smoking status, disease location or duration, the first month total dose, or previous infliximab therapy. The remission rate at weeks 4-6 was significantly higher in patients intolerant of infliximab as compared to those who lost response to this drug. Adalimumab was well tolerated overall. Conclusion: Adalimumab can be considered a suitable option in patients with moderate-to-severe CD, demonstrating sustained long-term effectiveness.

Abstract

Background: Controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease (CD), but there is, however, only limited long-term experience with adalimumab in daily practice. Aim: To assess the long-term effectiveness and safety of adalimumab in a multicenter cohort of practice-based patients with moderate-to-severe CD. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of CD patients who received adalimumab over a 3-year period. Disease severity was scored using the Harvey-Bradshaw index (HBI). Remission was defined as an HBI of </=4 and response as a reduction in the HBI of >3 points at evaluation compared to the baseline. Univariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictive variables associated with response. Results: The charts of 55 patients were reviewed; remission and response rates observed at weeks 4-6 were 52.7 and 83.6%, respectively. Remission was maintained at weeks 12, 24 and 52 in 89.6, 72.4 and 44.7% of patients, respectively. Remission and response rates were not influenced by smoking status, disease location or duration, the first month total dose, or previous infliximab therapy. The remission rate at weeks 4-6 was significantly higher in patients intolerant of infliximab as compared to those who lost response to this drug. Adalimumab was well tolerated overall. Conclusion: Adalimumab can be considered a suitable option in patients with moderate-to-severe CD, demonstrating sustained long-term effectiveness.

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9 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:25 Mar 2010 15:29
Last Modified:01 Jul 2016 12:46
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0012-2823
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000253855
PubMed ID:20093835

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