UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Predator-specific landscapes of fear and resource distribution: effects on spatial range use


Willems, E P; Hill, R A (2009). Predator-specific landscapes of fear and resource distribution: effects on spatial range use. Ecology, 90(2):546-555.

Abstract

Although ecologists have long recognized that animal space use is primarily determined by the presence of predators and the distribution of resources, the effects of these
two environmental conditions have never been quantified simultaneously in a single spatial model. Here, in a novel approach, predator-specific landscapes of fear are constructed on the basis of behavioral responses of a prey species (vervet monkey; Cercopithecus aethiops), and
we show how these can be combined with data on resource distribution to account for the observed variation in intensity of space use. Results from a mixed regressive–spatial regressive analysis demonstrate that ranging behavior can indeed be largely interpreted as an adaptive
response to perceived risk of predation by some (but not all) predators and the spatial availability of resources. The theoretical framework behind the model is furthermore such that it can easily be extended to incorporate the effects of additional factors potentially shaping
animal range use and thus may be of great value to the study of animal spatial ecology.

Abstract

Although ecologists have long recognized that animal space use is primarily determined by the presence of predators and the distribution of resources, the effects of these
two environmental conditions have never been quantified simultaneously in a single spatial model. Here, in a novel approach, predator-specific landscapes of fear are constructed on the basis of behavioral responses of a prey species (vervet monkey; Cercopithecus aethiops), and
we show how these can be combined with data on resource distribution to account for the observed variation in intensity of space use. Results from a mixed regressive–spatial regressive analysis demonstrate that ranging behavior can indeed be largely interpreted as an adaptive
response to perceived risk of predation by some (but not all) predators and the spatial availability of resources. The theoretical framework behind the model is furthermore such that it can easily be extended to incorporate the effects of additional factors potentially shaping
animal range use and thus may be of great value to the study of animal spatial ecology.

Citations

76 citations in Web of Science®
79 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

133 downloads since deposited on 12 Mar 2010
28 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:12 Mar 2010 13:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:00
Publisher:Ecological Society of America
ISSN:0012-9658
Additional Information:Copyright by the Ecological Society of America
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1890/08-0765.1
PubMed ID:19323238

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 3MB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 3MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations