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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-32370

Bischoff-Ferrari, H A; Dawson-Hughes, B; Shao, A; Hathcock, J; Giovannucci, E; Willett, W C (2010). Benefit–risk assessment of vitamin D supplementation. Osteoporosis International, 21(7):1121-1132.

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Abstract

Current intake recommendations of 200 to 600 IU vitamin D per day may be insufficient for important disease outcomes reduced by vitamin D. INTRODUCTION: This study assessed the benefit of higher-dose and higher achieved 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels [25(OH)D] versus any associated risk. METHODS AND RESULTS: Based on double-blind randomized control trials (RCTs), eight for falls (n = 2426) and 12 for non-vertebral fractures (n = 42,279), there was a significant dose-response relationship between higher-dose and higher achieved 25(OH)D and greater fall and fracture prevention. Optimal benefits were observed at the highest dose tested to date for 700 to 1000 IU vitamin D per day or mean 25(OH)D between 75 and 110 nmol/l (30-44 ng/ml). Prospective cohort data on cardiovascular health and colorectal cancer prevention suggested increased benefits with the highest categories of 25(OH)D evaluated (median between 75 and 110 nmol/l). In 25 RCTs, mean serum calcium levels were not related to oral vitamin D up to 100,000 IU per day or achieved 25(OH)D up to 643 nmol/l. Mean levels of 75 to 110 nmol/l were reached in most RCTs with 1,800 to 4,000 IU vitamin D per day without risk. CONCLUSION: Our analysis suggests that mean serum 25(OH)D levels of about 75 to 110 nmol/l provide optimal benefits for all investigated endpoints without increasing health risks. These levels can be best obtained with oral doses in the range of 1,800 to 4,000 IU vitamin D per day; further work is needed, including subject and environment factors, to better define the doses that will achieve optimal blood levels in the large majority of the population.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center on Aging and Mobility
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
DDC:610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
360 Social problems & social services
Language:English
Date:July 2010
Deposited On:27 Feb 2010 08:19
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 18:17
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0937-941X
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00198-009-1119-3
PubMed ID:19957164
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 93
Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 122

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