UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Predator-induced behavioural responses: tadpoles of the neotropical frog Phyllomedusa tarsius do not respond to all predators.


Schmidt, B R; Amézquita, A (2001). Predator-induced behavioural responses: tadpoles of the neotropical frog Phyllomedusa tarsius do not respond to all predators. Herpetological Journal, 11(1):9-15.

Abstract

Many species show behavioural responses to predators that reduce predation mortality but
are assumed to be costly. We tested whether an induced behavioural response is predator-specific and whether the strength is related to the risk of being killed by a predator. We used tadpoles of the neotropical frog Phyllomedusa tarsius as prey, and larvae of an aeshnid dragonfly and belostomatid bugs as predators. Belostomatids killed twice as many tadpoles within 24 hours as aeshnids did. Tadpoles reduced activity in the presence of aeshnids by 30% but did not respond at all to the more dangerous belostomatids. Tadpoles did not show spatial avoidance of predators. We favour the explanation that tadpoles of P. tarsius did not respond to belostomatids because belostomatids are encountered too rarely for evolution to favour an induced response to belostomatids.

Many species show behavioural responses to predators that reduce predation mortality but
are assumed to be costly. We tested whether an induced behavioural response is predator-specific and whether the strength is related to the risk of being killed by a predator. We used tadpoles of the neotropical frog Phyllomedusa tarsius as prey, and larvae of an aeshnid dragonfly and belostomatid bugs as predators. Belostomatids killed twice as many tadpoles within 24 hours as aeshnids did. Tadpoles reduced activity in the presence of aeshnids by 30% but did not respond at all to the more dangerous belostomatids. Tadpoles did not show spatial avoidance of predators. We favour the explanation that tadpoles of P. tarsius did not respond to belostomatids because belostomatids are encountered too rarely for evolution to favour an induced response to belostomatids.

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
19 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2001
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:13
Publisher:The British Herpetological Society
ISSN:0268-0130

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations