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The Attractive Female Body Weight and Female Body Dissatisfaction in 26 Countries Across 10 World: Regions: Results of the International Body Project I


Swami, V; Frederick, D A; Aavik, T; Ruch, Willibald; Proyer, Rene T (2010). The Attractive Female Body Weight and Female Body Dissatisfaction in 26 Countries Across 10 World: Regions: Results of the International Body Project I. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 36(3):309-325.

Abstract

This study reports results from the first International Body Project (IBP-I), which surveyed 7,434 individuals in 10 major world regions about body weight ideals and body dissatisfaction. Participants completed the female Contour Drawing Figure Rating Scale (CDFRS) and self-reported their exposure to Western and local media. Results indicated there were significant cross-regional differences in the ideal female figure and body dissatisfaction, but effect sizes were small across highsocioeconomic-status (SES) sites. Within cultures, heavier bodies were preferred in low-SES sites compared to high-SES sites in Malaysia and South Africa (ds = 1.94-2.49) but not in Austria. Participant age, body mass index (BMI), and Western media
exposure predicted body weight ideals. BMI and Western media exposure predicted body dissatisfaction among women. Our results show that body dissatisfaction and desire for thinness is commonplace in high-SES settings across world regions, highlighting the need for international attention to this problem.

This study reports results from the first International Body Project (IBP-I), which surveyed 7,434 individuals in 10 major world regions about body weight ideals and body dissatisfaction. Participants completed the female Contour Drawing Figure Rating Scale (CDFRS) and self-reported their exposure to Western and local media. Results indicated there were significant cross-regional differences in the ideal female figure and body dissatisfaction, but effect sizes were small across highsocioeconomic-status (SES) sites. Within cultures, heavier bodies were preferred in low-SES sites compared to high-SES sites in Malaysia and South Africa (ds = 1.94-2.49) but not in Austria. Participant age, body mass index (BMI), and Western media
exposure predicted body weight ideals. BMI and Western media exposure predicted body dissatisfaction among women. Our results show that body dissatisfaction and desire for thinness is commonplace in high-SES settings across world regions, highlighting the need for international attention to this problem.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:body weight, body dissatisfaction, cross-cultural, socioeconomic differences, attractiveness, International Body Project
Date:2010
Deposited On:10 Mar 2010 13:35
Last Modified:09 Jun 2016 09:20
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0146-1672
Publisher DOI:10.1177/0146167209359702
Official URL:http://psp.sagepub.com/current.dtl
PubMed ID:20179313
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-32437

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