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Brain responses to auditory and visual stimulus offset: shared representations of temporal edges


Herdener, M; Lehmann, C; Esposito, F; Di Salle, F; Federspiel, A; Bach, D R; Scheffler, K; Seifritz, E (2009). Brain responses to auditory and visual stimulus offset: shared representations of temporal edges. Human Brain Mapping, 30(3):725-733.

Abstract

Edges are crucial for the formation of coherent objects from sequential sensory inputs within a single modality. Moreover, temporally coincident boundaries of perceptual objects across different sensory modalities facilitate crossmodal integration. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in order to examine the neural basis of temporal edge detection across modalities. Onsets of sensory inputs are not only related to the detection of an edge but also to the processing of novel sensory inputs. Thus, we used transitions from input to rest (offsets) as convenient stimuli for studying the neural underpinnings of visual and acoustic edge detection per se. We found, besides modality-specific patterns, shared visual and auditory offset-related activity in the superior temporal sulcus and insula of the right hemisphere. Our data suggest that right hemispheric regions known to be involved in multisensory processing are crucial for detection of edges in the temporal domain across both visual and auditory modalities. This operation is likely to facilitate cross-modal object feature binding based on temporal coincidence.

Edges are crucial for the formation of coherent objects from sequential sensory inputs within a single modality. Moreover, temporally coincident boundaries of perceptual objects across different sensory modalities facilitate crossmodal integration. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in order to examine the neural basis of temporal edge detection across modalities. Onsets of sensory inputs are not only related to the detection of an edge but also to the processing of novel sensory inputs. Thus, we used transitions from input to rest (offsets) as convenient stimuli for studying the neural underpinnings of visual and acoustic edge detection per se. We found, besides modality-specific patterns, shared visual and auditory offset-related activity in the superior temporal sulcus and insula of the right hemisphere. Our data suggest that right hemispheric regions known to be involved in multisensory processing are crucial for detection of edges in the temporal domain across both visual and auditory modalities. This operation is likely to facilitate cross-modal object feature binding based on temporal coincidence.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2009
Deposited On:09 Mar 2010 11:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:02
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1065-9471
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.20539
PubMed ID:18266216
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-32673

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