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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-32750

Müller, D W H; Bingaman Lackey, L; Streich, W J; Hatt, J M; Clauss, M (2010). Relevance of management and feeding regimens on life expectancy in captive deer. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 71(3):275-280.

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Abstract

Objective—To establish a demographic approach to facilitate the comparison of husbandry success for deer species in zoos and to test for factors that influence the performance of deer species in captivity.
Sample Population—Data collected from 45,736 zoo-kept deer that comprised 31 species.
Procedures—Data had been collected by the International Species Information System during the last 3 decades on zoo-kept deer around the world. The relative life expectancy
(rLE) of a species (ie, mean life expectancy as a proportion of the maximum recorded life span for that species) was used to describe zoo populations. The rLE (values between 0 and 1) was used to reflect the husbandry success of a species.
Results—A significant positive correlation was found between the rLE of a species and the percentage of grass in the natural diet of the species, suggesting that there are more problems in the husbandry of browsing than of grazing species. The 4 species for which a studbook (ie, record of the lineage of wild animals bred in captivity) was maintained had a high rLE, potentially indicating the positive effect of intensive breeding management.
Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The rLE facilitated the comparison of husbandry success for various species and may offer the possibility of correlating this quotient with other biological variables. Ultimately, identifying reasons for a low husbandry success in certain species may form the basis for further improvements of animal welfare in captivity.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals > Clinic for Zoo Animals, Exotic Pets and Wildlife
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Date:2010
Deposited On:23 Mar 2010 15:05
Last Modified:23 Nov 2012 13:06
Publisher:American Veterinary Medical Association
ISSN:0002-9645
Publisher DOI:10.2460/ajvr.71.3.275
PubMed ID:20187828
Citations:Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 7

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