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Contextual aspects of early trilingualism


Chevalier, Sarah (2008). Contextual aspects of early trilingualism. In: Nikolaev, Alexandre; Niemi, Jussi. Two or More Languages: Proceedings from the 9th Nordic Conference on Bilingualism. August 10–11, 2006. Joensuu, 37-46.

Abstract

The present paper reports on work in progress in the field of early trilingual language development. Specifically, it explores the question: What contextual (i.e. social and situational) factors help or hinder young children in acquiring three languages in infancy? For a number of years now, research in bilingualism has recognised the importance of context (societal, familial and conversational) in analysing language use in bilingual couples (Piller 2002) and families (Okita 2002), as well as in understanding the early acquisition of two languages by children (De Houwer 1990, Döpke 1992, Lanza 2004). In this paper, I hope to see whether the theoretical approaches developed in such studies are equally useful for the analysis of early trilingualism. After describing the data (section 1), I shall give a general idea of the various contexts in which children grow up with three languages in a Western European country (section 2). The major part of this paper (section 3) will then be devoted to
an examination of certain contextual factors affecting the linguistic development of a young trilingual child.

The present paper reports on work in progress in the field of early trilingual language development. Specifically, it explores the question: What contextual (i.e. social and situational) factors help or hinder young children in acquiring three languages in infancy? For a number of years now, research in bilingualism has recognised the importance of context (societal, familial and conversational) in analysing language use in bilingual couples (Piller 2002) and families (Okita 2002), as well as in understanding the early acquisition of two languages by children (De Houwer 1990, Döpke 1992, Lanza 2004). In this paper, I hope to see whether the theoretical approaches developed in such studies are equally useful for the analysis of early trilingualism. After describing the data (section 1), I shall give a general idea of the various contexts in which children grow up with three languages in a Western European country (section 2). The major part of this paper (section 3) will then be devoted to
an examination of certain contextual factors affecting the linguistic development of a young trilingual child.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > English Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:820 English & Old English literatures
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:24 Mar 2010 06:07
Last Modified:08 May 2016 11:19
Number:43
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-33088

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