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Geomorphological observations of permafrost and ground-ice degradation on Deception and Livingston islands, maritime Antarctica


Vieira, G; Lopez-Martinez, J; Serrano, E; Ramos, M; Gruber, S; Hauck, C; Blanco, J J (2008). Geomorphological observations of permafrost and ground-ice degradation on Deception and Livingston islands, maritime Antarctica. In: 9th International Conference on Permafrost, Fairbanks, Alaska, 29 June 2008 - 3 July 2008, 1939-1844.

Abstract

The Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing one of the fastest increases in mean annual air temperatures (ca. 2.5oC in the last 50 years) on Earth. If the observed warming trend continues as indicated by climate models, the region could suffer widespread permafrost degradation. This paper presents field observations of geomorphological features linked to permafrost and ground-ice degradation at two study areas: northwest Hurd Peninsula (Livingston Island) and Deception Island along the Antarctic Peninsula. These observations include thermokarst features, debris flows, active-layer detachment slides, and rockfalls. The processes observed may be linked not only to an increase in temperature, but also to increased rainfall, which can trigger debris flows and other processes. On Deception Island some thermokarst features may be related to anomalous geothermal heat flux from volcanic activity.

The Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing one of the fastest increases in mean annual air temperatures (ca. 2.5oC in the last 50 years) on Earth. If the observed warming trend continues as indicated by climate models, the region could suffer widespread permafrost degradation. This paper presents field observations of geomorphological features linked to permafrost and ground-ice degradation at two study areas: northwest Hurd Peninsula (Livingston Island) and Deception Island along the Antarctic Peninsula. These observations include thermokarst features, debris flows, active-layer detachment slides, and rockfalls. The processes observed may be linked not only to an increase in temperature, but also to increased rainfall, which can trigger debris flows and other processes. On Deception Island some thermokarst features may be related to anomalous geothermal heat flux from volcanic activity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Event End Date:3 July 2008
Deposited On:29 Aug 2008 11:07
Last Modified:19 Jul 2016 12:36
ISBN:978-0-9800179-3-9
Official URL:http://uspermafrost.org/meetings/nicop/proceedings.html
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-3320

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